Only one abstract per first author is allowed for symposia or contributed sessions, with the exception that an author may present a second presentation in a designated Diversity, Equity and Inclusion (DEI), Outreach or Education themed session. These sessions are noted with an * in the session list below.

Aquatic Chemistry

Title: Beyond Ecotox: Opportunities and Networks for Integrating Ecosystem Contaminants Research

Abstract:

Contaminants are agents of global change that operate at ecosystem scales and are a tell-tale signature of anthropogenic impact. While eco- and environmental toxicologists have studied the adverse health effects of environmental contaminant exposure for decades, there is an emerging emphasis on investigating contaminants as mediators of environmental change and as mechanisms for elucidating ecological pathways and processes. Scientists pursuing this emergent area of research face significant hurdles, from assembling collaborator teams with the requisite areas of expertise, to securing resources that support large-scale investigations of contaminants at many levels of biological organization. This session focuses on the grand challenges of studying contaminants using an ecosystems approach. We invite presentations that explicitly address challenges and opportunities for interdisciplinary ecosystem contaminants research (e.g. cross-disciplinary collaboration, developing unifying theories and/or conceptual frameworks). The session is part of a broader effort to build a diverse network of scientists working at the intersection of ecosystem science, ecology, and ecotoxicology. We invite participants from all sectors with interests including, but not limited to, ecological subsidy fate and transport, microbial ecology, biogeochemistry, ecosystem functioning, and population and community structure. The session will feature a synthesis presentation and interactive panel discussion.

Organizers:

Jess Brandt, University of Connecticut, [email protected]
Arial Shogren, University of Alabama, [email protected]
Austin Gray, Virginia Tech, [email protected]

Title: Ecological responses to freshwater salinization

Abstract:

Salinization of freshwaters due to anthropogenic activities is rapidly increasing globally, altering biotic communities and impairing ecosystem services. Salinization of freshwater is affected by climate change and anthropogenic activities like resource extraction, agriculture, and urbanization, potentially interacting with other stressors to alter biological processes. While freshwater salinization is a global phenomenon, its spatial footprint and wide-ranging biological consequences remain largely understudied relative to other stressors. Accompanying shifts in the background water chemistry of freshwater environments are alterations in ion and osmoregulatory responses that could have cascading effects across all levels of ecological organization. Freshwater animals collectively experience wide ranges of salt types and concentrations, reflecting natural environmental variation as well as novel chemical cocktails produced by human activities. Despite the increased concern for salinization, comprehensive assessments of freshwater animal responses, including how those responses vary across regions and taxa, have been lacking. Such assessments would inform more effective monitoring and policies for more protective management of salinization, as well as identify knowledge gaps and relate these gaps to other taxonomic groups as a means to enhance predictive capacity and focus future research and conservation.

Organizers:

Sally Entrekin, Virginia Tech, [email protected]
Abigail Belvin, Virginia Tech, [email protected]
Rich Walker, Upper Iowa University, [email protected]

Title: Marine Debris & Microplastic in the Great Lakes: Sources, Impacts, and Solutions

Abstract:

Microplastics, plastics, and other marine debris have been found in environments around the world, including in freshwater systems like the Great Lakes. As a growing field of study, understanding the sources, sinks, and transformations of this debris and its impacts to the environment are an important step to developing lasting and effective solutions. This session will gather experts in the field to highlight recent advancements in marine debris research, including detection, quantification, characterization, and implications of plastics and other marine debris, the impacts debris has in the Great Lakes, as well as projects which highlight how scientific research and new technologies can inform collaborative solutions.

Organizers:

Melissa Maurer-Jones, University of Minnesota Duluth, [email protected]
Kathryn Schreiner, University of Minnesota Duluth, [email protected]
Elizabeth Minor, University of Minnesota Duluth, [email protected]
Lisa Sealock, Environment and Climate Change Canada, [email protected]
Sarah Lowe, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, [email protected]

Title: Per- and Polyfluoroalkyl Substances (PFAS) Contamination in Aquatic Systems

Abstract:

Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS), are of increasing concern to the scientific community, policymakers, and the general public in the Great Lakes region and beyond. These surface and ground water contaminants pose threats to human health, but also threaten the health of fish and wildlife populations. There are increasing efforts related to research and monitoring of PFAS in the region, including addressing levels and trends in various matrices, including fish, wildlife, domesticated animals and plants. For this session we invite presentations about known PFAS sources and cycling in the region, including potential sources, factors affecting environmental transport and fate, and compounds measured in various media in the region, through both research and monitoring programs; presentations about PFAS ecotoxicology, with an emphasis on risks to fish and wildlife via laboratory, field observational, and modeling studies; and research related to PFAS exposures and risks to avian and terrestrial wildlife and domesticated animals across the Great Lakes region. We also invite presentations about PFAS uptake into plants and invertebrates as a route of exposure and also impacts on trophic dynamics. While the emphasis is on studies in the Great Lakes region, we encourage submissions on these topics from or relevant to other large aquatic ecosystems.

Organizers:

Cheryl Murphy, Michigan State University, [email protected]
Michael Murray, University of Michigan, [email protected]

Title: Walking a line between necessity and toxicity: Trace Metals

Abstract:

Preserving and sustaining our freshwater in lakes and rivers is vital to the survival of countless ecosystems. Many trace elements act as micronutrients for primary producers, at times limiting primary production in lacustrine systems or potentially supporting the growth of harmful algal blooms, while others can be toxic. Primary producers play and important role in the cycling of trace elements at low concentrations in bodies of water, as well as productivity and nutrient recycling. While some previous research has been done to determine sources, processes, and sinks that control trace metal distribution in the Laurentian Great Lakes and the associated watersheds, many questions remain on cycling rates, controls, and biological availability. We invite abstracts from lake, river, and wetland environments that focus on the distribution, processing rates, and incorporation of trace metals into biomass in these environments.

Organizers:

Lindsay Starr, Wright State University, [email protected]
Jordyn Stoll, Kent State University, [email protected]

Aquatic Ecology

Title: ‘Omics observatories in aquatic systems

Abstract:

The world of ‘omics is growing exponentially not only in the way we observe our aquatic systems, though advancement of autonomous in-situ platforms and analytic techniques, but also in data curation, storage, and sharing. The ongoing progress of in-situ technology, artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning (ML) tools, and cloud infrastructure has allowed us to develop ‘omics datasets with complementary environmental data allowing scientists to dive deeper into the structure and function at both the organism and ecosystems level. These new datasets and tools advance our ability to observe, model and understand how our aquatic systems are functioning and changing. The goal of the session is to bring together ‘omics researchers, bioinformaticians, statisticians, modelers, ecologists, and engineers to discuss the whole range of observational ‘omics from collection to understanding our complex ecosystem. We invite practitioners from across the community to share new observational methods and technologies to collect ‘omics data, the development of innovative AI and ML tools to analyze ‘omics data, and development of platforms to visualize and connect ‘omics and environmental datasets. Through the symposium we aim to open up new avenues to explore complex scientific questions, promote efficiency, identify possible gaps, and assist in ecosystem management.

Organizers:

Reagan Errera, NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory (GLERL), [email protected]
Subba Rao Chaganti, University of Michigan Cooperative Institute for Great Lakes Research (CIGLR), [email protected]
Gregory Dick, University of Michigan Cooperative Institute for Great Lakes Research (CIGLR), [email protected]
Cody Sheik, University of Minnesota Duluth Large Lakes Observatory, [email protected]
Michael McKay, University of Windsor Great Lakes Institute for Environmental Research, [email protected]
Trina McMahon, University of Wisconsin – Madison, [email protected]

Title: Better Collaborations Lead to Better Answers: Large-scale Collaborative Success Stories

Abstract:

Cooperative science and monitoring programs for large aquatic ecosystems have gained popularity over the past 30 years, as individual organizations or researchers recognized the value of sharing information and working together. Some of the most effective collaborations provide the opportunity to focus on unique questions and data gaps that one entity alone cannot address. However, approaches for sharing and analyzing data, and communicating outcomes, vary from system to system, and entity to entity. This session will highlight success stories from large-scale (i.e., basin- or region-wide) research and monitoring collaborations that have led to an expansion in knowledge and understanding. We particularly invite presentations that highlight successful collaborations with groups traditionally underrepresented in decision-making and research prioritization processes. We expect to feature successful examples from the Cooperative Science and Monitoring Initiative (CSMI) in the Laurentian Great Lakes, a bi-national effort by the United States and Canada to coordinate Great Lakes research and monitoring initiatives, but welcome submissions from cooperative programs outside of CSMI and beyond the Great Lakes region.

Organizers:

Kristin TePas, Illinois-Indiana Sea Grant, Univ. of IL, [email protected]
Carolyn Foley, Illinois-Indiana Sea Grant, Purdue Univ., [email protected]
Paris Collingsworth, Illinois-Indiana Sea Grant, Purdue Univ., [email protected]
Annie Scofield, U.S. EPA, Great Lakes National Program Office, [email protected]
David Depew, Environment and Climate Change Canada, Government of Canada, [email protected]

Title: Deciphering past aquatic ecosystem dynamics using sedimentary ancient DNA

Abstract:

The field of molecular ecology has developed rapidly as a result of recent advances in genetics and genomics techniques, high-throughput DNA sequencing, and the development of new bioinformatics tools. One product of this rapid development has been the use of DNA recovered from lake and marine sediments, which has extended the historical record of aquatic ecosystems to centennial or even millennial time scales. These sedimentary ancient DNA (sedaDNA) archives can be used to characterize biodiversity trends, to illuminate past food web dynamics, and in the reconstruction of long-term environmental changes in aquatic ecosystems. For this session, we invite contributions from both marine and freshwater scientists that incorporate sedaDNA in their research program and/or educational activities. Through a pool of rich and diverse presentations, we aim to provide a synthesis across various sedaDNA data types and sites while emphasizing emerging molecular technologies or analytical approaches applied to sedaDNA archives. We especially encourage presentations that promote novel applications of sedaDNA that highlight the effects of rapid environmental change on the functioning of aquatic ecosystems in the Anthropocene.

Organizers:

Trisha Spanbauer, University of Toledo, [email protected]
Eric Capo, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, [email protected]
Marie-Eve Monchamp, McGill University, m[email protected]
Cecilia Barouillet, French National Institute for Agriculture, Food, and Environment, [email protected]

Title: Drones reveal patterns in aquatic ecosystems using high-frequency sampling

Abstract:

Aquatic ecologists increasingly rely on environmental sensor technologies to measure water quality at high temporal frequencies. High-frequency measurements using sensors can provide insights into drivers of water quality at hourly, daily, seasonal, and interannual time steps and can capture rare events. However, the typical stationary deployment limits our understanding of spatial patterns in physical, chemical, and biological parameters. The development and use of drones and mobile platforms for environmental sensing has increased rapidly in recent years. Such autonomous or semi-autonomous instruments, whether aerial or aquatic (surface or subsurface), can capture spatial patterns in aquatic ecosystems. The resulting spatially dense datasets enrich our fundamental understanding of heterogeneity of physical, chemical, and biological characteristics and processes in freshwater and marine environments, and can inform management on where and when to focus their efforts in these ecosystems. Drones and mobile sensor platforms have given aquatic ecologists the opportunity to assess rapid changes to aquatic ecosystems. To highlight the meeting theme of Rapid Changes ~ Collaborative Solutions at JASM 2022, we will host a special session exploring how drones and semi-autonomous systems have been used to advance our understanding of freshwater and marine environments. Studies that use novel methods to collect and analyze high-frequency spatial data are of especially great interest.

Organizers:

Natalie Griffiths, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, [email protected]
Peter Levi, Drake University, [email protected]
David Ortiz, University of Wisconsin – Madison, [email protected]
Emily Stanley, University of Wisconsin – Madison, [email protected]

Title: Drying freshwaters in the Anthropocene: ecological effects and socio-economic perspectives

Abstract:

Freshwaters are hot-spots of biodiversity but among the most threatened habitats on Earth. They support crucial biogeochemical cycles and provide key ecosystem services to people. In the Anthropocene Era, freshwaters are drying due to global change. Ecological effects of drying are gaining attention at the local scale, although effects at the larger spatial scales, where drying translates into landscape fragmentation, are often overlooked. The lack of knowledge how drying shapes regional-scale fluxes (material, water, organisms) prevents predicting how global change is altering freshwater ecosystem functions and services, and how this may affect public values and perceptions of such services. Drying freshwaters are generally disvalued by people, scientists and managers and lack effective conservation strategy or ecosystem management. Arising from an interdisciplinary group of international scientists involved in large collaborative research projects on drying freshwaters, this symposia investigates how global change cascades on to biodiversity, ecosystem functions and ecosystem services of lotic and lentic ecosystems, including ecological, social and economical aspects. It will explore ways to promote the adaptive management of drying freshwaters worldwide. This symposium welcomes presentations (15min-long) from eco-hydrology, biogeochemistry, community ecology, socio-economy, policy and management from all continents.

Organizers:

Thibault Datry, RiverLY research unit, INRAE, Villeurbanne, France, [email protected]
Amy Burgin, University of Kansas, [email protected]
Dan ALLEN, The Pennsylvania State University, [email protected]

Title: Extreme solutions to extreme problems: evolution of Cyanidiophyceae red algae

Abstract:

Our symposium will focus on the Cyanidiophyceae, a group of unicellular aquatic and terrestrial red algae that occupy a variety of hot springs and acid mining sites characterized by variable light levels, high temperature, low pH, with high salt and toxic heavy metal concentrations. Recent work has shown that Cyanidiophyceae follow the “1% rule”; i.e., on average, approximately 1% of their gene inventory comprises prokaryote genes acquired via horizontal gene transfer (HGT). A majority of these HGT candidates encode proteins with functions related to “polyextremophily”, including metal and xenobiotic resistance/detoxification, cellular oxidant reduction, carbon metabolism, amino acid metabolism, osmotic resistance, and salt tolerance. These traits make Cyanidiophyceae ideal models for engineering resistance genes and pathways into commercially important algae and plants to protect them from environmental stresses such as drought and heavy metal contamination. Other applications include alga-based production of compounds such as phycocyanin, floridosides, and glycogen, recovery of rare earth elements, and detoxification of heavy metals. Symposium speakers will cover a range of topics about Cyanidiophyceae evolution including genome biology, functional validation of HGT-derived genes, co-culture to achieve high growth rates, and meta-omics analysis at Yellowstone National Park to understand biotic interactions in nature.

Organizers:

Debashish Bhattacharya, Rutgers University, [email protected]
Hwan Su Yoon, Sungkyunkwan University, [email protected]

Title: Food web dynamics of Lake Erie: Applying ecosystem approach

Abstract:

Lake Erie has been the center of attraction for the researchers for a long time due to the impact of eutrophication and water quality degradation. Due to nutrient enrichment it suffered from harmful algal blooms, hypoxia and invasion of invasive species . The symposium expects to review the changing food web dynamics by applying multi-trophic ecosystem approach during last 25 years till 2019. A review of published books namely State of Lake Erie, 1999 and the pulse of Lake Erie, 2008 will be carried out. The current work done in 2019 will be the focus of attention. 2019 surveys was a multi agency efforts of 6 binational agencies work on various components of the project. The latest cruises focused on the following objectives
1. Quantify the influence of HABs and (or) bottom hypoxia on the structure, function, and dynamics of Lake Erie’s food webs
2. Explore the effect of these stressors on the quantity and quality of prey available to fish (e.g., yellow perch, walleye)
3. Understand the distribution and transfer of microcystin (MC) through the food web
4. Explore trophic pathways vs. gill uptake as the mechanism of MC transfer to fish consumers
By seeking to sample inside versus outside of i) HABs, ii) hypoxic zones, and iii) areas of combined HABs and hypoxia, we aimed to answer the following:
How does food web dynamics differed in various habitats
How do production, and energy flow differ in habitats
Papers are invited on any aspects of the lake Erie food web.

Organizers:

Mohi Munawar, Fisheries & Oceans Canada, [email protected]
Warren Currie, Fisheries & Oceans Canada, [email protected]

Title: Harmful and Nuisance Algal Bloom/Proliferation Impacts on the Environment

Abstract:

Harmful algae blooms and proliferations (HAB/Ps; e.g., Karenia, Microcystis, Lyngbya, and Pseudo-nitzschia) are known for impacting human health by releasing a wide range of toxins. These toxins impact drinking water sources, the shellfish industry, and recreational water activities on a yearly basis. Nuisance algal blooms (e.g., Sargassum and Ulva) may not produce toxins with known adverse human health impacts but can impair waterbodies and shorelines. In addition, both harmful and nuisance algae in high biomass have negative impacts on economic drivers, such as tourism, but these high-biomass blooms and proliferations do not just impact humans. As these blooms and proliferations grow and senesce, they impact members of the co-occurring invertebrate and vertebrate communities. Impacts of members of harmful and nuisance genera will be presented along with drivers for these blooms and proliferations through traditional and lightning talks.

Organizers:

Katherine Perri, [email protected]

Title: Importance of food webs for trophic transfer across aquatic ecosystems

Abstract:

Energy is transferred within an ecosystem through food webs. The species composition, temporal and spatial dynamics, sources and losses, and linkages to other ecosystems drive how trophic transfer occurs. While aquatic ecosystems are complex and cannot be described in a single unified manner, each system, whether it is pelagic lake, coastal marine or riverine, still follow certain patterns of energy transfer from nutrients to autotrophs to consumers. Modeling approaches acknowledge trade-offs between sufficient detail and over-complexity, but are ultimately designed to identify major trophic pathways. This knowledge of the fate of nutrients within aquatic ecosystems is vital to nutrient and resource management across these systems. Within eutrophic systems, management activities concern excess nutrients and energy not being transferred up the food web, while in very low nutrient systems, there are increasing anxiety regarding insufficient energy transfer to fisheries. Introduction of non-native species, or impacts from climate change can further complicate these relationships.

In this session we invite talks on how the composition of food webs determines energy flows within any aquatic ecosystem. There are many established and emerging tools available to track trophic transfer (biomass, stable isotopes, tracers, molecular tools) which may be relevant to this session. Discussion of new sampling methods, modeling or analysis, or novel uses of existing data are welcome.

Organizers:

Warren Currie, Fisheries & Oceans Canada, [email protected]
Kelly Bowen, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, [email protected]

Title: Innovative Approaches to Freshwater Monitoring

Abstract:

This session will use lighting talks and 1-2 panel discussions (depending on number of submissions) to share case studies and interactive demonstrations from multiple experts with participants. The session will center on an exploration of cutting-edge data collection and analysis systems for watershed and surface water management being designed and implemented across the Laurentian and other large lakes of the world. These systems will not be limited to just in-situ sensors, but will rather range from community science and remote sensing products to digital twins and low-cost wireless networks. By bringing together perspectives from research, nonprofit, and industry, this session will not only showcase technologies and research methods, it will highlight the collaborations and partnerships that enable development, piloting and field operation. Consider this session a water-tech symposium, with submissions including experiential components such as on-stage demonstrations of wireless sensor networking or navigating real-time data with VR technology along with conventional research presentations. Through these activities, attendees will be able to interactively participate in defining the future of data for freshwater science and stewardship within the Great Lakes and large lakes of the world.

Organizers:

Max Herzog, Cleveland Water Alliance, [email protected]
Ed Verhamme, LimnoTech, [email protected]

Title: Lang Symposium: Evolutionary ecology of cryptic species

Abstract:

Cryptic species – those that cannot be differentiated from one another based on traditional taxonomic characters – have become more prevalent as molecular tools have advanced our understanding of phylogenetics. In many groups, however, molecular phylogenies appear at odds with the evolutionary ecology of cryptic species. This problem is likely exacerbated by the difficulty of studying the ecology and natural history of these species, particularly in field studies. Yet, cryptic species complexes present a unique opportunity to study niche differentiation, coexistence, and speciation. In this Symposium, we seek to unite philosophical and logistical difficulties considerations across fields and provide an opportunity for cross-disciplinary synergy in developing a framework to study these interesting groups. We invite contributions on the study of ecophysiological differentiation and other mechanisms of coexistence, evolutionary ecology, and natural history of cryptic species, as well as discussion of methods of study and the use of historical datasets in a changing evolutionary context.

Organizers:

Sophie McCoy, [email protected]
Patrick Martone, [email protected]
Paul Gabrielson, [email protected]

Title: NEON data: leveraging continental scale data to advance freshwater science

Abstract:

The ability to conduct freshwater research at the continental scale has been limited due to the lack of systematic data collection of connected surface stream, groundwater, and terrestrial variables, and the effort required to do this repeatedly. However, aquatic data collected by NEON offers an unprecedented opportunity to answer research questions about freshwater sciences at a continental scale and over time. Numerous scientists and research programs are currently leveraging NEON data to answer myriad research questions in disciplines including community ecology, biogeochemistry, fluvial geomorphology, productivity, and metabolism. This session will gather speakers using NEON data from these various fields to 1) publicize current and future research utilizing NEON data, and 2) identify similarities and potential for synergistic collaborations. Speakers working on diverse questions, from diverse backgrounds and at all career stages in this session, will highlight a variety of research opportunities that NEON data provide for interdisciplinary research within freshwater science.

Organizers:

Justin Pomeranz, Colorado Mesa University, [email protected]
Brian Gill, , [email protected]
Jeff Wesner, , [email protected]
Jim Junker, , [email protected]
Eric Moody, Middlebury College, [email protected]
Amanda DelVecchia, Duke University, [email protected]

Title: One Health in Great Lakes Urban Ecosystems

Abstract:

Integrative approaches that link scientists, engineers, and community partners together are required to address climate change and maintain healthy urban ecosystems in the Great Lakes basin. The One Health concept recognizes the link between animal, plant, ecosystem, and planetary health and advocates for transdisciplinary approaches to improving ecosystem health. Urban centers are especially vulnerable to the impacts of climate change, from increases in extreme weather creating flooding to changes in urban biodiversity. Recent flooding in Great Lakes urban centers highlights the effects of climate change. The last two reports from the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) have stated that degradation of habitat and erratic climate that leads to warmer summers in northern climates will result in the spread of invasive organisms that are of human pathological importance, such as mosquitoes. The IPCC recently stated that humans cause these effects. Therefore, this session looks at urban aquatic habitat concerns where humans are densely concentrated and projected to increase. We invite speakers covering broad urban aquatic habitat issues such as: urban hydrology, flooding, the spread of invasive species, and aquatic vector borne disease. We aim to highlight the diverse approaches towards ecosystem health, identifying or monitoring anthropogenic changes to urban water, and One Health success in the Great Lakes basin.

Organizers:

Brendan O’Leary, Wayne State University, [email protected]
Adrian Vasquez, Wayne State University, [email protected]

Title: Phenological Change in Aquatic Ecosystems

Abstract:

Phenology, the annual timing of biological events, is consequential to nearly all biological and ecological processes. In a warming and more variable climate, phenology is a lens through which to study the influence of climate on ecology, evolution as well as hydraulic and hydrologic dynamics in aquatic ecosystems. Important phenological switches in lakes or streams may affect (i) the annual disappearance of ice in high latitude and altitude sites, representing a cyclical disturbance to the ecosystem to which species are adapted; (ii) changes in the timing of leaf out and leaf off, affecting light and organic matter availability in streams; or (iii) the prolongation of stratified summer conditions in lakes, which in turn may promote harmful algal blooms. Climate change is leading to shifts in not only the average timing of phenological events, but also their variance and predictability. Increasing phenological variability can create a stochastic environment that is critically understudied, particularly in aquatic ecosystems. There remains a clear need for applied and theoretical ecological research targeted at understanding phenological changes across multiple levels of biological organizations and types of aquatic habitats. Therefore, we invite contributions that investigate the effects of phenological change on aquatic ecosystems using monitoring, big data, modeling, and empirical approaches.

Organizers:

Robert Ladwig, University of Wisconsin-Madison, [email protected]
Emily Stanley, University of Wisconsin – Madison, [email protected]
Zach Feiner, University of Wisconsin-Madison, [email protected]
Hilary Dugan, University of Wisconsin-Madison, [email protected]

Title: Reeling in Historical Data: Temporal Changes in Aquatic Ecosystems

Abstract:

Freshwater ecosystems are affected by environmental changes including changes in climate and land use intensification. Undesirable outcomes include contamination, acidification, browning, eutrophication, oligotrophication, harmful algal blooms, proliferation of invasive species, and changes in species abundance and distributions. In order to better understand and predict the future effects of environmental change, use of historical datasets is essential. Such data include long-term ecological surveys, natural resource monitoring, paleolimnological reconstructions, and museum specimens with ancillary field notes. Because of the emergence of new tools and technologies and the integration across the disciplines of Ecology, Computer Science, Museums, Statistics, and others, these data-rich analyses are possible. In this session, we seek to focus on how historical data have helped our understanding of temporal changes in freshwater ecosystems. We invite researchers who bring together disparate data or methods from various disciplines to answer questions that span time. Examples of potential topics include, but are not limited to, species distributions, community ecology, paleoecology, challenges in integrating disparate data, and environmental and climate change. We welcome submission from a broad range of freshwater researchers in biological, chemical, and physical disciplines who integrate historical data into their research.

Organizers:

Katelyn King, University of Michigan, [email protected]
Karen Alofs, University of Michigan, [email protected]
Euan D. Reavie, University of Minnesota Duluth, [email protected]
Lars Rudstam, Cornell University, [email protected]
Lyubov Burlakova, SUNY College at Buffalo, [email protected]

Title: Scaling aquatic invasion dynamics

Abstract:

Biological invasions are one of the greatest threats to aquatic biodiversity, yet the global scale and rapid pace of invasion, spread, and ecosystem change make the phenomenon challenging to investigate. Aquatic ecologists must understand inter- and intra-specific interactions that affect these invasions, their detections, and management, yet the scale is too large to sample and thoroughly quantify all interacting variables. Therefore, scientists are using smaller scales–such as micro- and mesocosms, computer simulation, lab experiments, etc.–to understand the mechanisms that drive larger scale invasion processes. Often, these empirical solutions require collaboration among different taxonomic, spatial, and technological scales. This session will facilitate collaboration among invasion biologists experimenting at small scales to respond to hypotheses within aquatic invasion biology. We hope to bring together scientists from all career levels that represent a variety of work in different study systems from a diversity of institutions and backgrounds. JASM offers a unique opportunity to address these cross-cutting concepts (invasion biology, ecosystem scaling) through multiple societies and ecosystems.

Organizers:

Courtney Larson, University of Minnesota Duluth/US EPA, [email protected]
Megan Corum, University of Minnesota – Duluth, [email protected]
Meagan Aliff, Natural Resources Research Institute, University of Minnesota – Duluth, [email protected]

Title: Talking trash: The ecology of litter in freshwaters

Abstract:

Anthropogenic litter (AL) or manufactured solid material that is discarded and persistent in the environment, includes a diversity of material types (e.g., plastic, metal, textiles) and sizes (i.e., nanoplastics to construction debris). AL is ubiquitous across freshwater ecosystems, and a signature of global change. Monitoring the accumulation of AL in the environment has been ongoing for decades, but advancements in the field require placing AL in a dynamic ecological context. Understanding the sources, fates, and biological interactions of AL across multiple spatial and temporal scales is critical to sustaining ecosystem services and the integrity of our freshwater ecosystems. Integrative ecological approaches that explicitly consider fate, transport, and multiple interactions will generate results that bridge knowledge gaps necessary to implement management and policy frameworks that protect our waters. This session will focus on AL ecological research that spans different freshwater ecosystems, habitats, scales of inquiry, interactions, and strategies to reduce litter. Speakers will present work that connects studies in ecotoxicology with analyses using community, ecosystem, and restoration ecology tools. Research presentations will be followed by a panel discussion to discuss knowledge gaps and build collaborative solutions. All participants are welcome to consider how current and future research can support aquatic ecosystems under global change.

Organizers:

Rae McNeish, California State University, Bakersfield, [email protected]
Rebecca Rooney, University of Waterloo, [email protected]
Timothy Hoellein, Loyola University Chicago, [email protected]

Title: Two decades (and counting) of applying DNA techniques to aquatic sciences

Abstract:

The development of DNA barcoding as a molecular tool for taxonomy began in earnest nearly two decades ago. The field has since expanded from single-specimen analysis to include metabarcoding and environmental DNA methods, which have now existed for over a decade themselves. Within the various fields of aquatic sciences, these genetic/genomic tools have been used to address many research topics including biological assessment, monitoring and detecting invasive, keystone, threatened, and endangered species, population diversity, community diversity, biochemical processes, bio/phylogeography, cryptic species, and pathogen detection. The applications have covered a variety of habitats from streams, to wetlands, to marine environments, and across the flow spectrum from ephemeral to perennial rivers. This session will include a brief historical context of these applications, highlight a variety of current efforts in these research topics across aquatic science disciplines, and provide a look ahead. Presenters will discuss the latest advances and future goals of applying molecular tools to address critical scientific needs, improve conservation and restoration efforts, and to help manage environmental problems in diverse aquatic habitats.

Organizers:

Erik Pilgrim, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, [email protected]
Nathan Smucker, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, [email protected]
Eric Stein, Southern California Coastal Water Research Project, [email protected]
Susanna Theroux, Southern California Coastal Water Research Project, [email protected]

Title: Understanding and Predicting Distribution and Impacts of Aquatic Invasive Species

Abstract:

Invasive species are a leading threat to native species and biodiversity, are an important driver of global ecological and evolutionary change, restructure food webs, and have caused significant economic damage. Freshwater ecosystems are vulnerable to biological invasions. Invasive species are predicted to be the most important driver of biodiversity decrease in lakes and the third most important driver in streams (after land use and climate) for the year 2100 (Sala et al 2000). Accurate prediction of patterns of introduction, spread, and impact are essential to success in targeting limited management resources. We specifically welcome talks focused on shifts in vectors of introduction, mapping at-risk habitats, habitat suitability mapping,identifying characteristics of successful high impact invaders, prediction of factors limiting or facilitating introduction, establishment, dispersal and impact (including invasion meltdown), migration of species in response to changing climate or land use, predictive models relating to distribution and impact, understanding time lags in impacts of invasion, assessing invasive species as a component of a multi-stressor impact, assessment of economic impact, and development of new indicators Talks can focus on particular species or geographic regions, but should be framed to promote discussion of broader implications and/or transferability.

Organizers:

Rochelle Sturtevant, Michigan Sea Grant, Michigan State University, [email protected]
Doran Mason, NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory, [email protected]
Austin Bartos, Michigan Sea Grant, University of Michigan, [email protected]
Wesley Daniel, USGS, [email protected]

Title: Understanding Reservoir Function in a Changing World

Abstract:

Reservoirs are ubiquitous in the landscape. These human-made lakes and ponds provide many essential services, including flood control, water supply, irrigation, navigation, and hydropower, in addition to recreational opportunities. Yet reservoirs also directly influence ecological processes, including carbon cycling, sediment retention, nutrient transformation, and methane emissions, biodiversity, animal migration patterns, among others. Given the generally quick aging of reservoirs due to their high sedimentation rates and their large watersheds (compared to natural lakes), these systems may be critically affected by ongoing and coming environmental challenges such as climate change and the development of divergent human demands on these systems.

With this symposium we seek, generally, (1) to identify those who currently work in the fields of reservoir limnology and all aspects of reservoir ecology in an effort to build connections and collaborations within this group, and (2) to identify the critical research themes and approaches which may provide avenues to building sustainability in these—by definition—temporary aquatic ecosystems. A particularly useful approach might include comparing reservoir ecosystems with other aquatic systems, including lakes, rivers, and estuaries.

We encourage contributions on all aspects of reservoir limnology and ecology, especially those contributions by early career scientists and those studying reservoirs throughout the world.

Organizers:

Joseph Conroy, Ohio Department of Natural Resources, [email protected]
Bridget Deemer, USGS, Southwest Biological Science Center, [email protected]
Maria Gonzalez, Miami University, [email protected]
Nicole Hayes, University of Wisconsin – Stout, [email protected]
Kristin Strock, Dickinson College, [email protected]
Michael Vanni, Miami University of Ohio, [email protected]

Title: Urban freshwater ecosystems: multiple stressors and manifold opportunities

Abstract:

Human populations are increasingly concentrated in cities, subjecting urban water systems to multiple stressors from diffuse and point sources, and escalating demands for access to freshwater and recreation. Though we all share responsibility for maintaining the health of our urban waters, understanding how multiple stressors impact water quality remains lacking. Additionally, there may be opportunities for citizen science in urban areas, which could foster better monitoring and more inclusive management. These knowledge gaps are further accentuated given uncertainties related to climate change and future population growth. This symposium will bring together researchers across fields to discuss the challenges of mixed contaminants and multiple stressors in urban water systems. Contaminants can include a mixture of trace heavy metals, microplastics, road salt, pharmaceuticals, and pesticides. Invasive species, harmful algal blooms, nutrients, and urban heat island effects adds additional stressors. Engineered wastewater drainage systems are often built to twin natural waterways, so cross-contamination from anthropogenic waste streams may be an increasing concern as zoonotic diseases and antibiotic resistant bacteria increasingly make their way into natural aquatic systems. This session calls on joint aquatic scientists to first consider gaps in knowledge about these multiple stressors and secondly to consider ways to educate and engage the urban public.

Organizers:

Don Jackson, University of Toronto, [email protected]
Stephanie Melles, Ryerson University, [email protected]

Title: Winter Science Symposium – Understanding and adapting to changes in winter climate and freshwater ice across the spectrum of inland waters from the Laurentian Great Lakes to shallow ponds and streams

Abstract:

North-temperate, boreal, arctic, and alpine ecosystems all experience a period of the year when surface waters may freeze, and yet we often base our management decisions on data from ice-free observations. Across different biomes from the Laurentian Great Lakes to shallow ponds, commonalities exist in freshwater ice shapes ecological and ecosystem processes, even though the duration and thickness of ice cover vary widely. This session focuses on the role of winter and ice in shaping inland aquatic habitats, be that through physical, chemical, or biological processes, and the ramifications of changing ice patterns. The goal is to highlight studies that use a variety of approaches, from empirical field studies and experiments, to remote sensing and modeling, with the aim of sparking innovative approaches and creative collaborations that improve our understanding of river and lake ice and freshwater habitats in a changing climate, and guide the prioritization of science needs and resource management.

Organizers:

Hilary Dugan, University of Wisconsin-Madison, [email protected]
Catherine OReilly, Illinois State University, [email protected]
Sapna Sharma, York University, [email protected]
Xiao Yang, University of North Carolina, [email protected]
Michael Twiss, Clarkson University, [email protected]
Marguerite Xenopoulos, Trent University, [email protected]
Rachel Evelyth, [email protected]

Atmospheric/Climate Science

Title: Atmospheric Deposition of Nitrogen: Changes, Challenges and Aquatic Ecosystem Impacts

Abstract:

Nitrogen (N) levels are increasing in many aquatic ecosystems, and contributions from atmospheric sources can be substantial, particularly in shallow lakes and coastal estuarine systems. Where are our data gaps, and what are the research and monitoring needs for advancing our understanding of N deposition processes (both wet and dry)? What collaborative research partnership (federal, state, and academic) opportunities are there? Where are N-deposition hotspots located, and how are aquatic ecosystems in these regions being impacted by changes in nitrogen to phosphorus ratios (TN:TP)? Is climate change amplifying N deposition? Can local land use/management actions reduce N-deposition in these hotspots?

Organizers:

Diane Lauritsen, LIMNOSCIENCES, [email protected]
LaToya Myles, NOAA, [email protected]
Nebila Lichiheb, NOAA, [email protected]
Kari St. Laurent, Delaware Nat. Estuarine Research Reserve, [email protected]

Title: Coastal Wetland Resilience to Extreme Disturbances

Abstract:

The coastal land margin is a mosaic of wetland types that are distributed along several abiotic gradients (i.e. hydroperiod, salinity, and temperature). Droughts, hurricanes, and cold fronts are common natural disturbances, but the myriad effects on herbaceous and woody vegetation can also make these ecosystems more vulnerable to change, potentially shifting them into new ecosystems. Climate change is leading to an increase in the intensity, duration, and frequency of droughts and hurricanes, while cold fronts are expected to become less frequent across the coastal land margin. Recovery from extreme disturbances is dependent on the ecosystem’s current level of resilience and its disturbance legacy. Resilience is widely used to describe an ecosystem’s ability to: recover to its previous state; resist to change; retain ecosystem functions; and adapt to change. Assessing coastal wetland resilience to extreme disturbances is useful for policymakers and land managers to better anticipate and prepare for the effects of future changes. Additionally, coastal communities are reliant upon coastal wetlands to provide numerous ecosystem services (e.g. carbon sequestration, storm surge attenuation, and nutrient filtration). This session invites studies addressing coastal wetland resilience in mangrove, marsh, and forest ecosystems to extreme disturbances using a variety of methods including remote sensing, field and lab-based studies, and hydrological modeling.

Organizers:

Melinda Martinez, Unites States Geological Survey, [email protected]
Elliott Jr. White, Stanford University, [email protected]

Title: Effects of climate driven changes in rainfall on aquatic ecosystems

Abstract:

Anthropogenic climate change is affecting aquatic ecosystems across the globe. While the impacts of climate change driven alterations to ambient air temperatures on ecosystems grab headlines, the topic of how temperature driven changes to the global hydrologic cycle will impact aquatic ecosystems needs more attention. Both the structure and function of inland waters, particularly small streams, is tightly linked to rainfall in a wide range of ways. Rainfall drives patterns of water movement across the landscape and the composition and abundance of terrestrial vegetation throughout the watershed and riparian zone. Estuarine and coastal waters are also strongly affected by the hydrologic cycle through the downstream delivery of materials and freshwater. Some regions of the world are predicted to become drier and others wetter, thereby altering the timing, frequency, and intensity of rainfall events, which likely affects ecosystem function in aquatic ecosystems in myriad ways. In this session we bring together researchers that seek to understand how these changes to the hydrological cycle will impact structure and function of all types of aquatic ecosystems from headwaters to estuaries. We hope that by bringing together these data stories we can improve our understanding of the major mechanisms by which rainfall changes will impact aquatic ecosystems in the future, and also identify systems at the greatest risk.

Organizers:

Christopher Patrick, Virginia Institute of Marine Science, [email protected]
Amber Ulseth, Sam Houston State University, [email protected]
Matthew Whiles, University of Florida, [email protected]
Bradley Strickland, Virginia Institute of Marine Science, [email protected]

Title: Greenhouse Gas Dynamics of Coastal and Freshwater Ecosystems

Abstract:

Aquatic ecosystems have a large impact on global climate due to their influence on atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases (GHGs) such as methane (CH4), carbon dioxide (CO2), and nitrous oxide (N2O). Wetlands, streams, and lakes release GHGs at a rate equivalent to over a third of total GHG emissions via fossil fuel burning. However, many uncertainties remain about the complex interactions among biological processes, climate, and land use and management that regulate the dynamics of nutrients and GHGs at different spatio-temporal scales and determine the climate feedbacks of these systems. For example, it is poorly understood how warmer conditions will affect the degradation of organic matter under aerobic versus anaerobic conditions, and the future dynamics of methane production in oxic surface waters. In this session, we aim to bring together researchers from diverse disciplines to discuss the dynamics and drivers of GHG emissions from aquatic ecosystems, as well as their implications for land management practices and climate mitigation schemes. We encourage contributions focusing on 1) fluxes of greenhouse gases and their biophysical drivers, 2) production, consumption, and transport processes of GHGs, 3) the roles of microorganisms and vegetation in GHG cycles, 4) pathways for C and N transport into and out of aquatic ecosystems, 4) advances in measurement and modeling techniques, and 5) considerations for effective policies and management practices.

Organizers:

Justine Missik, The Ohio State University, [email protected]
James Cotner, University of Minnesota-Twin Cities, [email protected]
Jorge Villa, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, [email protected]
Kevin Rose, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, [email protected]
Paul del Giorgio, Université du Québec à Montréal, [email protected]
Tonya DelSontro, University of Waterloo, [email protected]

Title: Synthesizing global drivers of ecosystem responses to tropical cyclones

Abstract:

Hurricanes, and tropical cyclones more broadly, are among the most destructive natural disturbances to coastal environments, causing severe disruptions via storm surge, saltwater intrusion, wind damage, and flooding. Global climate models predict that the severity of these events will increase and that the spatial distribution of regions that regularly experience tropical cyclones will shift poleward over the next century. This creates the need to predict how these disturbance events will impact aquatic ecosystems in coastal regions of the world. While there is a huge body of literature documenting the effects of individual storms on individual components of aquatic ecosystems, there is a need to advance our larger understanding of the mechanistic drivers, both the characteristics of storms and the history and pre-storm status of the affected ecosystems, that drive ecosystem response magnitude and recovery time. In this session we bring together researchers that seek to understand the mechanistic processes driving the resistance and resilience of aquatic ecosystems, from headwaters to the coastal marine environment. We hope that by bringing together these data stories we can enhance our understanding of what dictates the susceptibility of aquatic ecosystems to tropical cyclone impacts, thereby enhancing our abilities to predict where the greatest risks lie and inform management strategies to minimize future impacts.

Organizers:

Beth Stauffer, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, [email protected]
Christopher Patrick, Virginia Institute of Marine Science, [email protected]
William McDowell, University of New Hampshire, [email protected]
John Kominoski, Florida International University, [email protected]
David Lagomasino, Eastern Carolina University, [email protected]
Enie Hensel, Virginia Institute of Marine Science, [email protected]

Behavioral/Social Science

Title: A new community of practice for fishery and ecosystem services valuation

Abstract:

In April, 2021, a bi-national group of Great Lakes institutions convened a workshop about improving efforts to measure, map, and communicate values associated with Great Lakes fisheries and ecosystems services. Participants heard from experts in the fields of economics, social science, ecosystem services, conservation, commercial/recreational fishing, Indigenous rights, and public policy. Three major recommendations emerged: (1) develop standard methods for socioeconomic valuation to promote consistency, comparability, and credibility of information; (2) develop a “Great Lakes Valuation” community of practice to prioritize research needs, build support, and foster interdisciplinary work; and (3) develop relationships and mechanisms to integrate western science and Indigenous knowledge into valuation studies.

This symposium will continue the momentum from the workshop and begin laying the foundation for establishing the recommended community of practice. A panel will discuss various aspects of Great Lakes fishery and ecosystem services valuation, why a community of practice is important to helping support the needs of agencies and organizations, and how ecosystem services valuation information could be best put to use. Ultimately, ecosystem services valuation must become a key component of research, monitoring, assessment, planning, and decision making in the basin. This symposium is a natural and vital extension to work done in 2021 to move toward that objective.

Organizers:

Marc Gaden, Great Lakes Fishery Commission, [email protected]
David Burden, International Joint Commission, [email protected]
Philippa Kohn, The Nature Conservancy, [email protected]
Robert Lambe, Great Lakes Fishery Commission, [email protected]
John Livernois, University of Guelph, [email protected]
Rajendra Poudel, International Joint Commission, [email protected]
Jennifer ReadUniversity of Michigan Water Center, [email protected]
Scott Sowa, The Nature Conservancy, [email protected]
Chiara Zuccarino-Crowe, [email protected], Michigan Sea Grant

Title: Access and Human Connection to Public Waters: Research and Outreach

Abstract:

As climate change results in more extreme heat events and the COVID-19 pandemic pushes more and more people to find local, socially-distanced options to recreate, the social value of public water bodies has soared. This has resulted in increased pressure on vulnerable waters that offer valuable cultural ecosystem services, but that face being degraded by uninformed public use. Unfortunately, the human connection to public waters is often overlooked in lake management and outreach efforts sometimes go unevaluated. Who uses public water bodies of all sizes, and for what? Is access equitable and are public access points managed to provide the cultural ecosystem services needed by a diverse population? How do you effectively reach non-user populations to invite them to use and protect these resources? This session invites presentations on new research into public use of waters and the assessment of outreach efforts to reach new users and to create informed users.

Organizers:

James Gawel, University of Washington Tacoma, [email protected]
Avery Shinneman, University of Washington Bothell, [email protected]
Rachel Fricke, University of Washington Seattle, [email protected]

Title: Broadening Participation in the Aquatic Sciences

Abstract:

The participation of diverse individuals in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields remains disproportionately low relative to the demographics of the U.S. population, despite the recognition that diverse perspectives improve our capacity for innovative science. This session will share strategies and outcomes of initiatives meant to broaden the participation of historically marginalized and minoritized groups in our disciplines, including methods to increase the recruitment and retention of marginalized and minoritized populations, mitigate barriers to inclusion, and improve the work culture and environment for all.

Organizers:

Susan Park, Coastal and Estuarine Research Federation, [email protected]
Vanessa Lougheed, University of Texas at El Paso, [email protected]
Wei Wu, University of Southern Mississippi, [email protected]

Title: Collaborations between ecologists and economists to improve aquatic ecosystem management.

Abstract:

Management of aquatic ecosystems requires Federal, Tribal, Regional, State or local managers, as well as diverse stakeholders, to make decisions that have consequences for the ecosystems and for the people who use, enjoy, or appreciate them. Biophysical scientists have some capacity to measure the ecological consequences of accumulated past decisions and predict the ecological consequences of some options for the future. All too often those consequences are described in a manner not well understood by lay publics and not useful for analysis of tradeoffs or benefits analysis. Thus, there is a frequent gap between the information that biophysical scientists produce and that social scientists need to most effectively inform decision making. This is especially important in quantitative analysis in which biophysical modeling is linked with economic analysis and evaluation.

Organizers:

Paul Ringold, US EPA ORD, [email protected]
Ryan Hill, US EPA ORD, [email protected]

Title: Recognizing community dimensions within coastal restoration and revitalization.

Abstract:

Scholars recognize that remediation to restoration to revitalization is a stepwise, connected sequence; investment in nearshore environmental quality supports societal well-being within coastal communities. Restoration efforts have been framed as ecosystem-based management; this approach stresses that effective local efforts are required for successful delivery of ecosystem-scale programs. The Great Lakes Restoration Initiative is an example where agencies, communities, and organizations together engage in community scale delivery of restoration-revitalization programs. But little attention has been paid, in both scholarship and practice, to the local-scale, social and organizational dimensions of effective delivery, implementation, and sustenance of these investments. Social and organizational sciences have not been stressed, with the program emphasizing “on ground” engineering and bio-physical projects. Community and organizational scale aspects have been mostly left to coalesce on their own. Our symposium will highlight social and organizational dimensions within current restoration-revitalization efforts (any geography): Who is doing this local-scale work? How they are organizing to achieve objectives? How they are engaging with other entities? What obstacles are encountered? And how this local work is supporting ecosystem-scale programs and goals? Our format will be presentations by paired scientists and practitioners, highlighting the importance of co-learning.

Organizers:

Paul Seelbach, School for Environment and Sustainability, University of Michigan, [email protected]
Katie Williams, USEPA Office of Research and Development, Great Lakes Toxicology and Ecology Division, [email protected]

Biogeochemistry

Title: Advances in Remote Sensing Technologies to Monitor Water Quality in Large Lakes

Abstract:

Large freshwater lakes are an important resource that are sensitive to perturbations affecting ecosystem health, biodiversity, and services on local, regional, and global scales. Systematic monitoring of large lake water quality parameters, in light of a changing climate and anthropogenic forcing, is critical to inform stakeholder decision making. However due to the vast area and inaccessibility of most lakes, in situ observations alone are often insufficient to adequately capture spatial and temporal variability or lack quantifiable historical trends of key water quality variables. Several recurring needs of water quality monitoring programmes are directly related to measurable variables with Earth Observations satellites, including water clarity, phytoplankton biomass (chlorophyll-a), harmful or nuisance algal blooms (HNABs), suspended sediments, dissolved organic matter, and temperature. Remote sensing has therefore emerged as a required tool to monitor water quality in large lakes of the world. This session seeks contributions that use satellite and/or airborne remote sensing data to advance water quality monitoring capabilities in large freshwater systems, connected waterways, and coastal wetlands. Contributions highlighting the role of remote sensing in interdisciplinary studies are also encouraged, as well as presentations describing the utilization of new or innovative sensors (such as hyperspectral, LiDAR, Polarimetry). Novel algorithm approaches for water quality

Organizers:

Michael Sayers, Michigan Tech Research Institute, [email protected]
Andrea Vander Woude, NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory, [email protected]
Caren Binding, Environment Climate Change Canada, [email protected]

Title: All Tributaries Great and Small: Connectors Across Ecosystems

Abstract:

From small streams to large rivers, tributaries and connecting channels provide a crucial link between ecosystems. These systems are dynamic, and understanding their internal processes often requires an interdisciplinary approach. To that end, this session seeks submissions that explore the role of tributaries as ecosystem linkages, as well as important ecosystems in their own right. We welcome research examining the role of tributaries as an interface between terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, as connections between aquatic systems both great and small and as important drivers of coastal estuarine processes. Applied topics, such as fish management, water-level control, and fresh water provisioning are also welcome.

Organizers:

Douglas Kane, Heidelberg University, [email protected]
Nate Manning, Heidelberg University, [email protected]
Laura Johnson, Heidelberg University, [email protected]

Title: Carbon Cycling and Climate Change Mitigation Potential of Wetlands

Abstract:

Wetlands store and sequester vast amounts of carbon that serve as a natural solution to offset anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases. Changes in environmental conditions, whether from climate change (e.g., warmer temperatures, more extreme events) or from human activities (e.g., drainage, restoration), can impact wetland biogeochemical cycling through ecosystem processes such as primary productivity, methane emissions and decomposition, ultimately altering carbon storage and sequestration potential. Changes in climate and land management also influence other important feedbacks between wetlands and climate, including nitrous oxide fluxes, thermal buffering, and albedo of wetlands, all of which affect the role of wetlands in regulating local and global climate. Given the current need to understand, quantify, and maximize climate benefits from natural systems, a symposium focused on the role of wetlands in climate change mitigation is both important and timely. The symposium features research on anthropogenic- and climate-related impacts to wetland carbon dynamics, such as on carbon stocks and fluxes, greenhouse gas fluxes, and changes in water and energy balances. We encourage a spectrum of topics from process-based mechanistic research to landscape-scale modeling. Talks that consider land management strategies to maximize climate benefits from wetlands will be highlighted.

Organizers:

Sheel Bansal, U.S. Geological Survey, [email protected]
Ellen Herbert, Ducks Unlimited, Inc, [email protected]
M. Siobhan Fennessy, Kenyon College, [email protected]
Kimberly Van Meter, Pennsylvania State University, [email protected]
Jessica O’Connell, University of Texas at Austin, [email protected]

Title: Carbon fluxes across ecosystem interfaces: Sources, cycling, and fate

Abstract:

The concept of an ecosystem boundary has long been used by aquatic scientists to help organize our thinking and research. Interfaces between ecosystem types or units (e.g., upland-wetland, network confluences, river-floodplain, groundwater-surface water, lentic-lotic, estuarine) are dynamic and often difficult to define, but separate regions with distinct hydrologic, biogeochemical, and biotic properties. Hydrologically mediated fluxes of organic and inorganic carbon across ecosystem interfaces can enhance landscape carbon processing, storage, and export. Cross-ecosystem material fluxes also provide critical substrates for biogeochemical cycles and subsidize food webs. Yet, understanding the forms and fates of carbon moving through soils, wetlands, streams, lakes, estuaries and other interface zones and ecosystem mosaics still presents a major research challenge — one that can only be tackled by bridging science across disciplines and ecosystem types. The goal of this session is to highlight research that connects hydrology, biogeochemistry, and ecology to (1) reduce current uncertainties in the magnitude and direction of carbon fluxes within and across ecosystem boundaries and (2) improve our predictive understanding of how interfaces impact ecosystem and landscape functions. We welcome presentations from different disciplines, spatial scales, hydrologic connections, modeling approaches, and types of ecosystem interfaces.

Organizers:

Erin Hotchkiss, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, [email protected]
Margaret Palmer, University of Maryland, College Park and National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center (SESYNC), [email protected]
Carla López Lloreda, Virginia Tech, [email protected]
Katie Wardinski, Virginia Tech, [email protected]
Stephen Plont, Virginia Tech, [email protected]
Jake Diamond, Institut national de recherche pour l’agriculture, l’alimentation et l’environnement, [email protected]
Daniel McLaughlinVirginia Tech, [email protected]

Title: Carbon in Urban Aquatic Ecosystems

Abstract:

Most ecosystems worldwide are impacted by human activities, yet the effects of anthropogenic pressures across scales are not adequately represented in existing ecosystem models. This is especially true for models of aquatic carbon (C) cycling. Patterns of urbanization and land-use change are not random, and human gradients exist parallel to and inextricably linked to biophysical gradients. The interactive effects of biophysical and human gradients across scales are critical for understanding any ecological patterns and processes, but this is especially true in urban ecosystems. We need novel and creative approaches to address how human activities drive C patterns and processes across scales. How are continental-scale climatic controls on local ecosystem function similar or different among urban landscapes? How do sources and processes of aquatic C cycling, which are subject to watershed-scale human (e.g., deforestation, wastewater inputs) and biophysical (e.g., underlying geology and climate) characteristics, vary across spatiotemporal scales? This session explores answers to these questions and discusses approaches for simultaneously integrating and disentangling the human and biophysical processes affecting in-stream C cycling among diverse urban aquatic systems

Organizers:

John Kominoski, Florida International University, [email protected]
Krista Capps, University of Georgia, [email protected]
Rebecca Hale, Idaho State University, [email protected]
Kristina Hopkins, U.S. Geological Survey, [email protected]
Allison Roy, U.S. Geological Survey, University of Massachusetts Amherst, [email protected]
Jen Morse, Portland State University, [email protected]
Annika QuickIdaho State University, [email protected]
Shuo Chen, Idaho State University, [email protected]

Title: Flooded with ideas on dry rivers: Hydro-biogeochemistry of intermittent freshwater systems

Abstract:

Currently, intermittent and ephemeral aquatic systems are globally pervasive and are expected to become increasingly common due to climate change. However, these systems are understudied relative to those with perennial streamflow or inundation. Due to the large heterogeneity in hydrologic connectivity, redox potential, and resource supply, intermittent and ephemeral aquatic ecosystems have a unique “hydro-biogeochemical heartbeat”. Non-perennial aquatic systems are of particular concern as they serve as a unique connection point at the terrestrial-aquatic interface and strongly influence downstream water quality. Moreover, complex spatial and temporal variations in hydrologic connectivity in non-perennial systems often require a unique interdisciplinary approach to advance understanding of the function of these systems and their response to global change.

Our special session seeks to bridge biogeochemical with hydrological functioning in intermittent and ephemeral aquatic ecosystems. We invite submissions from any relevant disciplines and encourage presentations that utilize all types of methodologies (e.g., high-frequency sensors, field observations, and/or manipulation experiments) across space and time. Submissions that synthesize findings across systems or address issues related to climate change are especially welcome. In particular, this session aims to connect early career researchers in the field to develop future collaborations and address emerging challenges.

Organizers:

Joel Singley, Colorado School of Mines, [email protected]
Shannon Speir, University of Alabama, [email protected]
Lluís Gómez Gomer, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, [email protected]
Teresa Silverthorn, INRAE, [email protected]

Title: Impacts of phytoplankton phosphorus physiology across aquatic ecosystems

Abstract:

Phosphorus regulates ecosystem production patterns from oligo- to eutrophic waters and anthropogenic phosphorus inputs represent a major disturbance to these production patterns in many regions. Phytoplankton play a central role in the response of aquatic ecosystems to phosphorus availability by assimilating inputs and mediating exports to other locations or trophic levels. Additionally, taxonomic differences in phytoplankton phosphorus metabolism represent key traits that affect phytoplankton community structure and thus the consumers or biogeochemical processes that are sensitive to that community structure. Metagenomic studies have provided an overview of gene distributions associated with phosphorus metabolism in recent years. Yet, this knowledge needs to be validated by physiomic studies to link the quantitative impact of phytoplankton physiology with ecosystem responses to phosphorus supply. This symposium invites talks and posters on all aspects of phosphorus metabolism in phytoplankton such as uptake, storage, or regulation of cell stoichiometry and the potential or observed impact of these processes on freshwater, coastal or marine ecosystem function. Studies presenting novel physiological methods or combinations of field, laboratory, and modelling approaches are especially encouraged. The symposium will include an interactive discussion on identifying physiological mechanisms of ecosystem response that can lead to better predictive models of aquatic ecosystems.

Organizers:

Maximilian Berthold, Mount Allison University, [email protected]
Justin Liefer, Mount Allison University, [email protected]

Title: Integrating perspectives on nitrogen fixation across the aquascape

Abstract:

N2 fixation, the microbial conversion of dinitrogen gas to biologically reactive ammonium, is a major component of the global N cycle and has been extensively studied in open-ocean and terrestrial ecosystems. Yet, rates and ecological dynamics remain virtually unknown for the inland and coastal aquatic ecosystems (lakes, wetlands, rivers, streams, estuaries) that connect terrestrial and marine biomes, which makes it impossible to predict how these ecosystems will respond to regional and global stressors. Warming surface temperatures, changes in nutrient use and loading to aquatic ecosystems globally, and increasing occurrence of harmful algal blooms make it essential to understand the spatial and temporal controls on this key process. In this session we will bring together scientists from all aquatic habitats who are working to elucidate the ecological and biogeochemical role of N2 fixation. We invite talks on any aspect of N2 fixation, such as quantifying rates using traditional and novel techniques, identifying biotic and abiotic controls from micro- to macro-scales, characterizing the diverse assemblages of organisms that contribute to N2 fixation across aquatic environments, and modeling rates and fates of fixed N using techniques from mechanistic modeling to machine learning. Coordinating research across these areas will advance aquatic sciences by fully integrating N2 fixation into ecological dynamics of aquatic ecosystems.

Organizers:

Amy Marcarelli, Michigan Technological University, [email protected]
Robinson Fulweiler, Boston University, [email protected]
Thad Scott, Baylor University, [email protected]

Title: Nutrients and Interactions that Impact Integrity in Surface Waters

Abstract:

Policies aimed at improving water quality have been implemented throughout the world. Like the U.S. Clean Water Act, their goal is often to restore and maintain the chemical, physical, and biological integrity of surface waters. Nutrient pollution adversely affects all three of these aspects of integrity, directly and indirectly. As a result, control of nutrients is one intervention that governments have pursued to protect waterbody integrity from eutrophication. Nutrient pollution, however, is not the only stressor that contributes to eutrophication. Other chemical, physical, and biological factors also influence expression of nutrient pollution effects.

This session explores the relative contributions of other chemical, physical, and biological factors that operate in concert with nutrient pollution and collectively give rise to eutrophication in freshwaters and estuaries. The session highlights research that explores the often complex, non-linear, diverse, and dynamic interactions of these factors. We encourage participation from all fields in which research takes an interdisciplinary approach to investigating what drives the effects of nutrient pollution. Understanding the contributing factors that influence nutrient pollution effects can offer clarity on the types of management efforts that prevent, mitigate, and remediate effects of nutrient pollution; the timescales and sequence of those efforts; and the public’s perception and valuation of these factors.

Organizers:

Galen Kaufman, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, [email protected]
Jacques Oliver, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, [email protected]
Lester Yuan, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, [email protected]
Kateri Salk, Tetra Tech, [email protected]
Rebecca Veiga Nascimento, Oklahoma Water Resources Board, [email protected]

Title: Ponds and shallow lakes: ecosystem processes

Abstract:

On a global scale, most of the world’s lakes are small (< 0.1 km2) and shallow (< 5 m) enough to be considered ponds. Ponds can go by many names (e.g., kettle ponds, vernal pools, and sometimes even wetlands), and they are often considered similar to shallow lakes. In this session, we will examine the ecosystem processes in shallow waterbodies and clarify differences among ponds, shallow lakes, and larger or deeper waterbodies. We envision topics covering ecosystem metabolism, greenhouse gas emissions, carbon burial, mixing and stratification dynamics, food webs, organic matter, and eutrophication in both natural and human-constructed waterbodies. We particularly encourage studies that compare waterbodies across environmental or size gradients. This session will facilitate continued discussion regarding the importance of integrating small and shallow waterbodies into our broader understanding of limnology and freshwater science.

Organizers:

Meredith Holgerson, Cornell University, [email protected]
David Richardson, SUNY New Paltz, [email protected]
Nicholas Ray, Cornell University, [email protected]

Title: Sediments affecting harmful algal blooms: multidisciplinary perspectives

Abstract:

Sediments are being increasingly recognized for their role in affecting the overall health of overlying water bodies. In particular, multiple mechanisms have been proposed by which benthic sediments can influence planktonic harmful algal blooms in lakes. These mechanisms include 1) surface sediments serving as a seedstock for blooms in the water column; 2) the input of nutrients and toxins due to diffusion or resuspension events; 3) the sequestration of nutrients and toxins via particle scavenging; and 4) the effects of resuspension on the light environment. However, the direction and magnitude of those individual effects, and also their potential interactions or synergies, appear to differ dramatically among ecosystems and contexts, limiting our ability to generalize and predict the impact of sediments on blooms. Furthermore, the observation and elucidation of these processes is inherently interdisciplinary and requires perspectives from both macro- and microbiology, geochemistry, physics, and optics. For this symposium, we invite contributions that: synthesize these mechanisms and their impacts across different ecosystems, incorporate sediment processes into models or forecasts, apply advanced technologies and observing systems, and ultimately predict how the role of sediments will change in response to climate change, lake and watershed management, or other system drivers.

Organizers:

Jordon Beckler, FAU Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute, [email protected]
Casey Godwin, CIGLR, U. Michigan, [email protected]
Veronica Ruiz-Xomchuk, FAU Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute, [email protected]
Craig Stow, NOAA GLERL, [email protected]
Tim Moore, FAU Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute, [email protected]

Title: Stoichiometry in a Changing World: Assessing Elemental Ratios from Organisms to Ecosystems

Abstract:

Ratios of key elements are important in structuring and influencing ecosystem processes and services, including the productivity and community composition of primary producers, and growth rates of consumers. These ratios may vary systematically in space and time as a function of landscape characteristics or seasonality, providing geographic or temporal context for patterns in ecosystem responses. This may be especially pronounced in areas of significant environmental change, with alterations in land use or climate causing shifts in the relative availability, use, or flux of certain elements. Changes in nutrient availability pose a significant challenge to freshwater organisms and have the potential to dramatically alter aquatic communities. Elemental availability affects inter- and intra-species competition, community composition and biodiversity. Feedback mechanisms within species such as nutrient regulation, release or recycling might further enhance stoichiometric discrepancies. In this session we welcome contributions that 1) use experiments or surveys to assess biogeochemical cycles at the ecosystem scale, 2) scale up stoichiometric patterns from organisms to ecosystem, landscape, continental, or even global scales, or 3) identify links between elemental ratios and ecosystem processes at broad spatial or temporal scales. We particularly encourage participation from those interested in understanding these patterns in the context of widespread environmental changes.

Organizers:

Jana Isanta-Navarro, Flathead Lake Biological Station, University of Montana, [email protected]
Clay Prater, Oklahoma State University, [email protected]
Nicole Wagner, Baylor University, [email protected]
Kimberley Lemmen, University of Zurich, [email protected]
Libin Zhou, Peking University, [email protected]
Felicia Osburn, Baylor University, [email protected]
Yetkin IpekOklahoma State University, [email protected]
Jessica Corman, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, [email protected]
Patrick Kelly, [email protected], Rhodes College

Conservation/Restoration

Title: Spatial and Temporal Scales of Stressor Effects on Ecosystems

Abstract:

Most large aquatic ecosystems are influenced by multiple anthropogenic stressors in addition to natural drivers, both of which operate across ranges of spatial (local to regional) and temporal (hourly to decadal) scales. Many anthropogenic stressors also are nonstationary due to mitigation and other social factors. Further, each component of the ecosystem may respond to unique sets of stressors and drivers. Effective management and conservation requires developing an integrated understanding of ecosystem components, their stressors/drivers, and their relevant scales. For example, how might seasonal nutrient loading interact with regional climate drivers, and how do plankton communities with short generation times differ in their responses compared to longer-lived fishes or birds? The Great Lakes provides a strong study system to explore these issues due to the availability of extensive long-term monitoring data, the variety of stressors/drivers and ecosystems represented, and the mix of both negative and positive trends. This session also welcomes contributed studies from other aquatic ecosystems. This session will include broad overviews of drivers/stressors and their interactions, as well as focal studies on specific ecosystems and their components. The session will conclude with a discussion of similarities and differences among ecosystems, what still needs to be learned, and what the implications of multiple stressors are to ecosystem-based management.

Organizers:

Michael Fraker, University of Michigan, [email protected]
Michael Murray, University of Michigan, [email protected]
Jim Hood, The Ohio State University, [email protected]
James Sinclair, The Ohio State University, [email protected]

Title: Assessing and comparing climate change vulnerability of freshwater organisms

Abstract:

Climate change is affecting freshwater organisms across lentic and lotic ecosystems globally, but the degree of risk is unevenly distributed among taxa and regions. Moreover, outcomes of efforts to quantify risk among many species at once are influenced by data availability, data quality, scale, and project scope. How do we leverage a wide range of data and analytical methods available to identify the most at-risk species? What specific challenges do we face conducting these analyses for freshwater organisms? As we seek to understand drivers of biodiversity and their implications for management and conservation planning in aquatic habitats worldwide, identifying populations, species, and communities at increased risk of extinction due to climate change is of both fundamental and applied relevance. In this session, we will explore current approaches and methods for multispecies climate change vulnerability assessments for freshwater taxa. We aim to identify common challenges and areas of high potential across taxa, systems, and scales, with the goal of identifying collaborative solutions among scientists and practitioners across sectors and institutions.

Organizers:

Traci DuBose, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, [email protected]
Abigail Benson, U.S. Geologic Survey, [email protected]
Chloe Moore, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, [email protected]
Sam Silknetter, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, [email protected]
Meryl Mims, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, [email protected]

Title: Coastal wetland management and restoration in the Anthropocene

Abstract:

Coastal wetlands provide diverse ecosystem services. However, they have been disappearing rapidly in many parts of the world due to natural and anthropogenic stressors such as sea-level rise, land-use change and alterations to hydrology. To mitigate for some of the coastal wetland loss and loss of their key ecosystem services, efforts are being made to manage and restore them. Management and restoration of coastal wetlands is also a key component in climate change mitigation strategies as coastal wetlands are among the richest carbon sinks.
Through the symposium, we will bring scientists, coastal wetland managers, and NGOs together to showcase different restoration and management practices and lessons learned for future efforts. We will discuss a variety of management goals that include restoring hydrological connection, eradicating invasive species, increasing carbon sequestration, reducing wave energy, and corresponding restoration/management methods implemented such as dredge sediment wetland creation, river diversions, prescribed fire, soil water management, breakwater structures etc. We will evaluate potential co-benefits or unanticipated consequences in addition to the direct benefit of meeting management goals. We will investigate biogeophysical factors that may affect the efficacy of wetland restoration/management. We hope to summarize some lessons learned in order to help promote best practices of coastal wetland management under climate change in the future.

Organizers:

Wei Wu, University of Southern Mississippi, [email protected]
Tracy Quirk, Louisiana State University, [email protected]

Title: Community Science: Adding Value, Creating Action, and Impacting Regions

Abstract:

This session is a way to share community science challenges, strategies, and best practices with one another by focusing on answering a few questions:

– Can we build volunteer-driven water monitoring and data collection programs that bring value to our communities?
Engagement of community science (volunteer monitoring and data collection by non-expert residents) represents an important opportunity to expand water quality data collection capacity and address pressing Great Lakes challenges like HABs and CSOs. How can community volunteers and groups best support local communities and municipal stakeholders?
How can community science leverage credible data to build relationships and enable action?

– Community science groups typically develop practices and networks in response to hyper-local management needs. What is needed to enable individuals, governments and other institutions to leverage existing community science infrastructure? What can be done to bolster collaboration with researchers and decision makers?

– What would it look like for local programs to collaborate for regional benefit?
Beyond hyper-local programs, how can community science efforts create local and regional impact? What technical tools and data infrastructure are needed for this to be possible? How can community monitoring and data collection contribute to a new testbed for water technologies?

Organizers:

David Fitch, [email protected], [email protected]
Max Herzog, Cleveland Water Alliance, [email protected]
Linden Brinks, Great Lakes Observing System, [email protected]
Kat Kavanagh, [email protected], [email protected]

Title: Conservation of urban aquatic systems: Interdisciplinary solutions to complicated problems

Abstract:

Urban aquatic ecosystems and waterfronts are threatened by multiple stressors that degrade biodiversity, water quality, ecosystem integrity, and public health while exacerbating health inequalities in cities. These waterfronts are often the focus for inner city economic and recreational opportunities and provide urban residents with a vital connection to nature. Conflicting environmental, social, and economic goals can create complex challenges for managing, restoring and even understanding these systems. Addressing such challenges will require innovative and interdisciplinary solutions that extend beyond the expertise of natural scientists and conservationists to include social scientists, ecosystem modelers, policymakers, and managers. Recognizing social and cultural discrepancies is essential to finding long-term solutions to sustain a healthy, urban environment. Therefore, inclusive engagement of industry, non-profit organizations, and residents in addition to the recognition of cultural and environmental discrepancies are integral to creating innovative, sustainable solutions while fostering community buy-in. Outcomes from this session will address impacts of urbanization such as habitat loss, stormwater management, species introductions, contaminants and environmental injustices, and present solutions which include green infrastructure installations, community education, and predictive ecological modeling.

Organizers:

Donna Kashian, Wayne State University, [email protected]
Darrin Hunt, Wayne State University, [email protected]
Katrina Lewandowski, Wayne State University, [email protected]
Kishore Gopalakrishnan, Wayne State University, [email protected]
Hector Esparra-Escalera, Wayne State University, [email protected]
Brittanie Dabney, Wayne State University, [email protected]

Title: Depressional Wetland Biodiversity: Controls, Threats, and Conservation Implications

Abstract:

Freshwater ecosystems contribute disproportionately to global biodiversity but are also experiencing diversity loss at alarming rates. Depressional wetlands are widely distributed and contribute substantially to global biodiversity with endemic and uniquely adapted species, but are understudied compared to other freshwaters. They are one of the most endangered freshwater ecosystems due to widespread anthropogenic alterations that have lead to complex environmental changes. Understanding the mechanisms that maintain wetland biodiversity at different spatial (e.g., local, regional, global) and temporal scales is critical for the development of conservation practices that promote biodiversity resilience. While a majority of depressional wetland biodiversity studies are isolated investigations capturing relatively small snapshots in space and time, collectively they span a broad geographic area. The aggregation of these studies has enabled the development of statistical models used to understand drivers of wetland biodiversity at continental and global scales. This session will utilize a diverse array of talks from researchers working on different wetland organisms and at different organization levels (e.g., population, community, metacommunity), in order to synthesize the factors that control biodiversity at different spatial scales, identify threats to biodiversity loss, and discuss potential conservation strategies that can help maintain current levels of biodiversity.

Organizers:

Kyle McLean, U.S. Geological Survey, Northern Prairie Wildlife Research Center, [email protected]
Luis Epele, Centro de Investigación Esquel de Montaña y Estepa Patagónica (CONICET-UNPSJB), [email protected]

Title: Ecosystems on the edge: RADical approaches for southernmost coldwater systems

Abstract:

Coldwater ecosystems have undergone dramatic directional change. Land use, dams, fisheries, introduced species, and climate change have altered baselines across ecosystems. Transformative change impacts entire coldwater aquatic communities- benthic invertebrates in rivers, avian piscivores in estuaries, and marine mammals at sea. At southern edges of distribution (e.g., salmon in California and Maine), ongoing changes are particularly rapid. Management of systems and species must evaluate outcomes beyond historical norms (i.e. there may be no going back). These are complex problems and management of transforming systems may benefit from the approach provided by the RAD (Resist, Accept, Direct) framework. This framing encompasses a range of considerations: working to maintain historical norms (Resist); allowing autonomous changes (Accept), or facilitating transformation into a different but ideally more resilient future state that provides useful ecosystem services (Direct). In this session, we invite presentations that explore real-world examples of any of the three approaches being employed or studied in coldwater ecosystems at their southern distribution. This symposium is meant to build off an AFS 2021 symposium but with a special focus on species at the edge of their distributions and ensuring both content and dialog across other CASS societies.

Organizers:

John Kocik, NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science Center, [email protected]
Stephanie Carlson, University of California Berkeley, [email protected]
Sean Hayes, NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science Center, [email protected]
Abigail J Lynch, USGS National Climate Adaptation Science Center – Reston, VA, ajl[email protected]

Title: Evaluating wetland easements for restoration success

Abstract:

Wetlands provide valuable services to society, such as improving water quality and supporting diverse biotic communities. Since the 1700s, before these services were fully recognized, approximately 50% of all wetland surface area in the lower 48 states of the U.S. has been lost. Currently, billions of dollars are spent annually to create and restore wetlands using projects such as the Wetlands Reserve Program administered by USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service. This program has been used to restore over 2 million acres of flood-prone farmland in the U.S. from 1992 through 2013. However, few studies have quantified the ecological responses and economic valuation of these restoration projects. Also unclear is how restoration methodology, size, and position in the landscape affect the level of success given the range of possible restoration goals and stakeholders. Evaluating the success of wetland restoration strategies in improving ecosystem structure, function, and services can provide information to restoration practitioners to assist with advocacy for wetland restoration efforts, to establish restoration criteria, and to provide opportunities for more effective adaptive management for specific restoration goals. The goal of this symposium is to synthesize the current knowledge about strategies of easement implementation through the combined lenses of ecologists, economists, and resource managers.

Organizers:

Karen Baumann, Murray State University, [email protected]
Jessica Moon, Murray State University, [email protected]

Title: Genetic applications in conservation and restoration biology

Abstract:

Developing comprehensive conservation and restoration objectives requires a robust understanding of the distributions of taxa as well as intra- and inter-specific diversity within ecosystems. A continually evolving suite of genetic tools offers scientists and managers a means to quantify species presence and diversity, and to identify at-risk populations. This session will highlight ongoing applications of genetics for conservation and restoration ecology and how these data are leading to the development of new initiatives to preserve or mitigate the loss of diversity in aquatic systems. In the rapidly changing environments of today, rivers and lakes face many ecological perturbations that influence native communities including invasions of non-native species, alterations to stream flow, connectivity, and habitat, and shifting climate patterns. In response, restoration and management scientists often take action through genetic monitoring and, in some cases, interceding through activities such as stocking of domestically raised individuals, translocations, and habitat remediation. We invite speakers of all backgrounds to participate in our discussion of how genetics has influenced your research and is leading to improved management and restoration of aquatic communities.

Organizers:

Peter Euclide, Purdue University, [email protected]
Amanda Ackiss, USGS Great Lakes Science Center, [email protected]
Nadya Mamoozadeh, Michigan State University, [email protected]

Title: Great Lakes Tributary Restoration Projects – Successes, Challenges, and Approaches

Abstract:

The emphasis on dam removals and rivers restoration has increased in recent years. Many Great Lakes Basin tributaries have benefitted from such projects. This symposium will include representative projects from the basin with a look at successes, challenges, and approaches. What has worked, what are the most significant hurdles, and what approaches work best? Our presenters will address those questions. For those projects with available data on biological and habitat resources response, information will be included. We will include a panel/audience discussion after the presentations.

Organizers:

Tim Brush, Inter-Fluve, Inc., [email protected]
Maren Hancock, Inter-Fluve, Inc., [email protected]

Title: Improving and Implementing Water Conservation and Water Use Efficiency across Basin

Abstract:

At the intersection of Science, Policy, and Management, the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence River Basin Sustainable Water Resources Agreement (Agreement) and corresponding Compact call for providing leadership in developing science that would improve management of the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence River system. To that end, the Agreement’s Regional Body and Compact’s Council in 2019 adopted a Science Strategy to engage the scientific community regarding what would be of greatest assistance to decision makers. This session will focus on the priority research areas identified by the Regional Body and Compact Council for 2022—specifically, how to better understand which water conservation and efficiency programs will have the greatest impact in not only preserving water resources, but doing it in such a way as to protect water dependent natural resources, including aquatic species. The Science Strategy also recognizes the importance of engaging with indigenous organizations and encourages that traditional ecological knowledge be shared with the Regional Body and Compact Council, so there is a particular interest in having indigenous organizations participate in this session.

Organizers:

Peter Johnson, Great Lakes ST. Lawrence Governors & Premiers, [email protected]
Emily Finnell, Michigan Department of Environment, Great Lakes and Energy, [email protected]

Title: Improving Wetland Restoration Outcomes: Revisiting Monitoring and Adaptive Management

Abstract:

Wetland restoration projects require clear goals and objectives that are linked to measurable performance standards. After project implementation, restoration sites must be monitored to measure their response to the actions taken and compliance with the performance standards. Monitoring also provides feedback to inform the need for modifications to the site being monitored and/or to improve future restoration projects (i.e. adaptive management). Too often, monitoring is simply not conducted or is inadequate to provide the feedback needed to effectively facilitate meeting the desired outcomes. Monitoring and subsequent site management requires substantial time, money, and skilled technicians, all of which may not be available to all restoration projects. Even for projects that have ample resources or specific obligations per regulations (e.g. Clean Water Act in the USA), there usually is a designated and often arbitrary endpoint in terms of staffing, funding, or regulatory requirements. Are the commonly used monitoring approaches adequate to indicate that wetland restoration sites are self-sustaining and returning key ecological processes? Are there smarter ways to monitor sites that would result in more appropriate adaptive management actions and ultimately more favorable outcomes? This symposium will discuss how the implementation-monitoring-adaptive management feedback loop can be improved and will use case studies to illustrate specific examples.

Organizers:

Andy Herb, AlpineEco, [email protected]

Title: Integrating Social and Biophysical Research to Support Community Flood Resilience

Abstract:

Fluvial flood impacts have increased dramatically in recent years due to anthropogenic climate change and land use changes, and communities are searching for flood resilience strategies that lessen flood peaks while moving away from hard infrastructure. This session will highlight work that integrates social and biophysical research methods to support community-based strategies for attenuating flood levels and managing their impacts, including upland, floodplain, and channel restoration. Presentations might focus on place-based case studies, innovative methodological approaches, community-driven scenario modeling and decision-support tools, community-engaged workshops, implementation of natural flood management strategies, and more. This symposium hopes to highlight projects built from the ground up by representatives of different disciplines in collaboration with local communities and responsive to community-identified needs related to flooding.

Organizers:

Caroline Gottschalk Druschke, University of Wisconsin-Madison, [email protected]
Eric Booth, University of Wisconsin-Madison, [email protected]
Rebecca Lave, Indiana University, [email protected]

Title: On a quest for collaborative solutions: multicultural perspectives on aquatic conservation

Abstract:

Water is one of the most vital natural resources on the earth with a critical role in human health, food production, and ecosystem services. Access to safe drinking water and sustainably managed freshwater and marine ecosystems worldwide occupy a prominent place on the 2030 agenda of the United Nations. What role do our societies play in ensuring that aquatic science contributes to achieving these goals? Do we need stronger and more frequent international collaboration to address issues that transcend political boundaries? How can future leaders of our societies (Early Career members) better prepare for this titanic endeavor? This symposium will highlight ongoing aquatic research in Latin America involving early career professionals from different regions to get their perspectives on major issues for aquatic conservation and to support the career paths and needs of our societies’ members.

We welcome research and/or outreach presentations focused on any aspect, scale, or organism related to aquatic conservation and management in Latin America including, but not limited to, water scarcity, cultural eutrophication, habitat fragmentation, biodiversity losses, or climate change.

Both in person and virtual attendees are encouraged and video subtitle translation in English and Spanish will be available to overcome language barriers among participants.

Organizers:

Corey Krabbenhoft, University of Minnesota, [email protected]
Marc Peipoch, Stroud Water Research Center, [email protected]
Pablo Gutiérrez-Fonseca, University of Costa Rica, [email protected]

Title: Questions We Should Be Asking to Advance Aquatic Research and Conservation

Abstract:

Research and conservation provide benefits to society through a rigorous but focused scientific methodology. Basic and applied aquatic sciences have benefited from the rapid expansion of increasingly specialized disciplines fueled by the development of amazing new tools and the acquisition of increasingly sophisticated datasets. As a result, much progress has been made on questions that are prioritized by specific disciplines, journals, grant programs, agencies, and scientific societies. Because the way a question is asked can influence the answer identified, a casualty of our current specialized world may be that many important basic and applied scientific questions remain unexplored. In fact, by not actively encouraging a discussion of the “questions we should be asking,” scientific agencies, journals, and professional societies may actually discourage creative directions that could provide innovative new solutions. In this symposium, we ask members of multiple aquatic societies to combine their expertise, experience, and technical knowledge with well-reasoned speculation to propose and flesh out the broad contours of unconventional big picture questions that could lead to transformative breakthroughs in current unresolved problems.

Organizers:

Martha E. Mather, Kansas State University, [email protected]

Title: Springs: Unique aquatic habitats in steady decline

Abstract:

Spring habitats possess distinct features e.g.: they are multiple ecotones (groundwater-surface waters, aquatic-terrestrial, springhead-spring stream), show a microhabitat-mosaic structure, are hotspots of freshwater biodiversity, and encompass a large variety of environmental situations (from extremely-low alkalinity to saline, from still to swift waters, from strongly shaded to exposed etc.). Springs are globally pivotal to the well-being of humanity and nature. These fragile, keystone ecosystems are rapidly disappearing because of unchecked appropriation of groundwater and site-specific habitat destruction. Springs harbor disproportionately high biodiversity due to microhabitat heterogeneity and inter-site diversity in distribution and ecohydrogeology. However, exposure to direct and indirect anthropogenic impacts, including climate change and groundwater depletion, has caused increasing numbers of spring-dependent species to become extinct. This exploitation is likely to increase in the near future due to climate change and increasing water demands. Springs also have enormous, but under-appreciated cultural, societal, and economic significance, providing vital ecosystem goods and services throughout the world. However, springs are poorly recognized, mapped, monitored, and protected. The demise of spring ecosystems can be slowed or reversed by using sound scientific data and promoting informed debate among stakeholders and policy makers.

Organizers:

Marco Cantonati, MUSE – Museo delle Scienze, [email protected]
Roderick J. Fensham, The University of Queensland, [email protected]
Lawrence E. Stevens, Springs Stewardship Institute – Museum of Northern Arizona, [email protected]
John D. Wehr, Fordham University, [email protected]

Title: The Future of Aquatic Ecological Restoration in a Changing Environment

Abstract:

Ecological restoration has potential to restore biotic communities or ecological functions to a targeted pre-disturbance state or may inadvertently bring about conditions that favor no-analog (i.e., novel) communities – or return of ecosystem function – that may not be sustainable. This concern is more relevant today given the real and predicted impacts of a changing climate. Applying the principle of uniformitarianism, the measures taken today to restore tomorrow’s ecosystems may not be applicable under various climate change scenarios. Model-based predictions based on contemporary ecological patterns and processes to forecast the response of systems to ecological restoration actions are needed to develop ‘climate suitable’ strategies for the conservation of quality aquatic and adjacent riparian and terrestrial habitats over the long term.

This session brings together ecological restoration scientists and practitioners from diverse disciplines and organizations to share their experiences in how they adjust their restoration practices to anticipate and avoid creation of no-analog communities that are unsustainable under realized and future climate change scenarios. The metrics that are used to assess the effectiveness of novel restoration practices that are anticipatory of changing environmental conditions will be presented. The uncertainty of ecological response to often untested and unverified restoration treatments may be assessed within an adaptive management framework

Organizers:

Timothy Lewis, GDIT, Timo[email protected]
Craig Palmer, GDIT, [email protected]
Louis Blume, EPA-GLNPO, [email protected]

Fish and Wildlife

Title: Aquatic Species in Watersheds and Reservoirs in Weather Extremes

Abstract:

To date, no science forum has comprehensively, or directly, presented contemporary complexities of dynamic events for fish and aquatic species in a changing climate. This Symposium will address issues relevant to fish, fish survival and recruitment, year class dynamics, management of water resources, and aquatic species health (e.g., physiology, immunology, behavior, disease ecology) related to dynamic climatic and weather events. The Symposium will provide a forum for technical science presentations by topical experts and institutional representatives and promote communications among diverse groups of aquatic scientists and agencies. Scientific studies in riverine, lake, and reservoir ecosystems will be presented, and the Session contributions are expected to serve as a stepping-stone to an upcoming planned synthesis publication. Presentations will address the physical, social, economic, and environmental processes associated with water availability that influence fish condition, aquatic species populations, and supporting ecosystems. The Symposium will present on how aquatic species are being influenced by dramatic changes in water availability, volume, temperature, and quality associated with weather events. Reservoir and watershed management presentations will address species prevalence modeling, trophic interactions, fish stocking issues, harmful algal blooms, pathogens, stormwater runoff. Research avenues will be identified, prioritized, and partnerships envisioned.

Organizers:

David Hu, US Geological Survey, [email protected]
Jill Jenkins, US Geological Survey, [email protected]

Title: Fish growth: advances in analysis and understanding

Abstract:

Fish growth is a critical component of fishery production, and fish size, a result of individual growth, influences important dynamic processes including fishing mortality. This remains an active area of research, with recent advances exploring the nature and consequences of among individual variation in growth, how to track individual growth using increments on hard structures, incorporation of explanatory factors into growth models, and the nature of spatial and temporal variation in growth. This session is intended to provide a forum for presentation of advances in our understanding of fish growth including both empirical and modeling/analysis approaches. Topics of interest would include back-calculation approaches and studies of how increments are laid down on hard structures, new approaches to growth modeling and fitting such models, evaluations of the implications of growth variation on fishery management outcomes and evolutionary processes, and findings about how growth and condition is varying spatially and temporally and causes for this variation.

Organizers:

James Bence, Michigan State University, [email protected]
Elizabeth Stebbins, Michigan State University, [email protected]
Travis Brenden, Michigan State University, [email protected]

Title: Improved fisheries management by understanding spatial ecology

Abstract:

Over the last 20 to 30 years, advancements in electronic tagging technology (e.g., telemetry, PIT tags) have greatly expanded our ability study the spatial ecology of fish populations. In particular, advancements in acoustic telemetry and the deployment of passive acoustic receiver grids have facilitated the monitoring of fish movements from some of the largest freshwater systems in the world, including the Laurentian Great Lakes, large in-land lake systems and in marine systems. Advancements in other approaches for studying fish movement, such as genetics and otolith microchemistry, have also improved our ability to study the spatial ecology of fish populations. The scale at which information on spatial ecology of populations can now be collected using these approaches allows for better integration of spatial ecology when estimating population dynamics of exploited or invasive species or determining how such species may respond to harvest strategies or suppression efforts. The aim of this session is to highlight how information on spatial ecology and emerging research leads to further improvements in fishery management. Presentations from freshwater and marine systems highlighting findings associated with the spatial ecology of managed or invasive species for studying aquatic animal movements are encouraged, as are presentations focused on emerging modeling tools for blending spatial ecology with population dynamics or harvest strategy evaluations.

Organizers:

CHRISTOPHER VANDERGOOT, Michigan State University, [email protected]
Travis Brenden, Michigan State University, [email protected]
Matthew Faust, Ohio Department of Natural Resources, Division of Wildlife, [email protected]

Title: Lake Sturgeon Habitat and Population Restoration

Abstract:

Many sturgeon populations throughout the world are threatened or endangered. Significant effort has been expended to study and improve sturgeon habitats and to restore imperiled populations. This symposium will include cutting edge approaches, methods, ongoing assessments, and other means of monitoring sturgeon populations and critical habitat. Sturgeon researchers will provide insights and experience with these important species. We will focus on population goal setting; tools and methods to enhance sturgeon abundance; habitat surveys and assessments; restoration of key habitats; and habitat and population monitoring to gage species success. In addition to presentations, we will include an audience discussion panel.

Organizers:

Tim Brush, Inter-Fluve, Inc., [email protected]
David Coughlan, Inter-Fluve, Inc., [email protected]
Cortney Brown, Inter-Fluve, Inc., [email protected]

Title: Lampreys in a changing world: Challenges and opportunities

Abstract:

Lampreys represent >40 parasitic and non-parasitic species, inhabit freshwater, brackish and marine environments distributed both in the Northern and Southern hemispheres. They have a complex life cycle with protracted larval stage in freshwater, followed by true metamorphosis. Lampreys play significant role in aquatic ecosystems as prey, parasites, and predators. Some lampreys are also are commercially harvested. Many of them are conservation targets but sea lamprey in the Laurentian Great Lakes is an invasive pest.
Despite a long history of research lampreys still remain insufficiently studied. Much work has been directed at the invasive sea lamprey, but less work has occurred for other species. Interest is growing in research that answers basic biological and ecological questions to better inform conservation and management. However, there is much to be gained from research on sea lamprey and comparisons between species for management, conservation and control purposes.
The main purpose of this symposium is to provide an overview of the status of knowledge on the variety of topics related to taxonomy, zoogeography, phylogeny, molecular biology, evolution, life history, role in the ecosystem, stock assessment, fisheries, and management of lampreys worldwide as well as the research needs and perspectives for further advancement in this field. Presentations on human and climate change impact on lampreys, species restoration and stocks rebuilding are especially encouraged.

Organizers:

Alexei Orlov, Shirshov Institute of Oceanology of the Russian Academy of Sciences, [email protected]
Thomas Evans, Cornell University, [email protected]

Title: Reviewing cisco taxonomy in the Great Lakes & Lake Nipigon

Abstract:

The taxonomy of coregonine ciscoes in the Great Lakes and Lake Nipigon has not been comprehensively addressed in a century since the last species designations by Koelz in 1929. At the turn of the 21st century, genetic surveys using mitochondrial and microsatellite data led to proposals that variation in this species complex reflected geography rather than taxonomy and a single taxon, Coregonus artedi (sensu lato) be recognized. Following this, reviews of contemporary morphological data have supported the original species designations of Koelz and others but recommended that members of the species complex be relegated from species to “forms.” Recently, growing molecular resources have led to new genomic and transcriptomic data which indicate that differentiation between forms is greater than previously thought and new morphological analyses are uncovering previously undescribed diversity in shallow water cisco, highlighting a need for a comprehensive review of cisco taxonomy. In this session, we host the Joint American Fisheries Society-American Society of Ichthyologists and Herpetologists Committee on the Names of Fishes to review the most up-to-date data relating to the taxonomy of ciscoes in the Great Lakes and Lake Nipigon presented by experts with relevant research in historical distributions, traditional ecological knowledge, osteology, morphometrics, genomics, transcriptomics, movement, and larval and trophic ecology in order to reassess cisco taxonomy in this region.

Organizers:

Amanda Ackiss, USGS Great Lakes Science Center, [email protected]
Andrew Muir, Great Lakes Fishery Commission, [email protected]

Title: Wetland Science and Conservation from Diversified Wildlife Partnerships

Abstract: 

Significant resources have been devoted to wetland science and conservation in response to societal interests in supporting the habitat needs of wetland-dependent wildlife. Despite these accomplishments, threats to wetlands continue to accelerate beyond our capacity to offset them through traditional means and motives. Although wetland and wildlife professionals have long realized the benefits that wetlands provide beyond supporting wildlife populations, these broader ecosystem services are more widely valued and offer opportunities to build greater support for wetland conservation. This session will highlight ongoing contributions of wildlife interests to wetland science and conservation, and also discuss the growing importance of diversified partnerships for leveraging ecosystem services to expand interest in wetland conservation. The session will feature an overview presentation of ecosystem services and their value for broadened support, followed by presentations highlighting the role of traditional wildlife science and its integration with ecosystem services in advancing wetland science and conservation.

Organizer: 
Mike Brasher, Ducks Unlimited, Inc., [email protected]

Hydrology/Geomorphology

Title: Discoveries in ecosystem services provided by human created hydrological systems

Abstract:

Intentional environmental modifications result in the formation of new hydrological and geomorphic features in the landscape. These features share characteristics with their natural counterparts and may even provide comparable ecosystem services. Examples of human created hydrological and geomorphic features include, but are not limited to, canal networks, ditches, swales, retention ponds, reservoirs, treatment wetlands, and tile drains. Despite their extent, however, their role in the landscape is relatively unexplored. Further, because these systems are often left out of global/ conceptual models, we lack an understanding of what ecosystem services may be gained or lost in these systems in response to global change. Given the vast extent of human created hydrological systems globally, there is a need to understand both their role in providing ecosystem services (e.g., biogeochemical cycling, habitat provisioning, flood mitigation) as well as their resilience to future climate scenarios (e.g., sea level rise, storm intensification, species range shifts). The objective of this session is to assess the functional role of human created hydrologic features in the landscape. We invite presentations that evaluate the functional contributions of human created hydrological systems. Of particular interest are presentations that address how these systems respond to anthropogenic stressors, such as eutrophication and climate change.

Organizers:

Corianne Tatariw, University of Alabama, [email protected]
Anna Braswell, University of Florida/ IFAS, [email protected]

Title: Physical Processes in Lakes

Abstract:

This session’s focus is on the physical limnology of the Great Lakes and other lakes of the world. Papers are solicited dealing with field, modeling, experimental and laboratory studies of physical processes in lakes (waves, currents, turbulence, stratification, sediment transport, etc.) ranging in sizes from small, to medium and large.

Organizers:

Chin Wu, University of Wisconsin-Madison, [email protected]
Cary Troy, Purdue University, [email protected]
Jay Austin, University of Minnesota, Duluth, [email protected]
Eric Anderson, Colorado School of Mines, [email protected]

Modeling/Statistics

Title: Advancing Near-term, Iterative Ecological Forecasting in Aquatic Ecosystems

Abstract:

Near-term, iterative ecological forecasting – i.e., making predictions about the future state of ecosystems that account for uncertainty and are updated with new data as they become available – can be a critical tool for management of aquatic ecosystems experiencing both anthropogenic pressure and climate change. Recent advances in data availability and ecosystem models have positioned aquatic researchers to increase their use of forecasting for prediction of stream discharge, fisheries, hypoxic zones, algal blooms, drinking water availability, and other metrics of ecosystem functioning. Forecasts benefit a variety of stakeholders for uses ranging from preemptive mitigation of water quality and quantity concerns to protection of aquatic biota or planning recreational activities. Near-term forecasting also allows researchers to refine ecological theory by repeatedly confronting models with data, thereby improving models over time. However, many challenges remain to our ability to make and communicate near-term forecasts, including improving ecosystem models, model-data fusion, cyberinfrastructure, quantification and analysis of uncertainties, and effective forecast visualization. We solicit diverse presentations on both methodological and application-based research on forecasting hydrodynamics, biogeochemistry, and ecology in aquatic ecosystems, especially submissions that examine the role of uncertainty in forecast development, operationalization, and decision support.

Organizers:

Mary Lofton, Virginia Tech, [email protected]
Cayelan Carey, Virginia Tech, [email protected]
Alexandria Hounshell, National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, [email protected]
Caleb Robbins, Baylor University, [email protected]
Nicholas Record, Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences, [email protected]
Rafael Marcé, Catalan Institute for Water Research, [email protected]

Title: Ecological models as tools for integrating aquatic sciences

Abstract:

The volume and availability of data from aquatic ecosystems are rapidly expanding, changing the standard scale of analyses and increasing potential for understanding broad spatial and temporal patterns in aquatic ecology. These “big data” tend to be highly dimensional, presenting challenges for how to maximally and efficiently use them to develop mechanistic explanations of biological processes. These data can inform interpretable, robust models that have the potential to provide unprecedented understanding of aquatic ecosystem structure and function. However, to maximize this potential, we need to bring together data and modeling expertise from multiple ecosystems and disciplines to find collaborative solutions to environmental problems. While methodological differences have often hindered integrated perspectives on aquatic ecosystems, data streams across broad scales present an opportunity to bridge this divide with shared advances in modeling techniques. In this session, we invite contributions that explore ecosystem modeling and statistical approaches such as bayesian hierarchical modeling, machine learning, or other modeling methods to explain and predict ecological processes including population and community dynamics, biogeochemistry, hydrology, and phenology. We will highlight work from early career researchers in fields from freshwater to marine sciences that is expanding the scope of ecological modeling and has the potential to be applied across aquatic ecosystems.

Organizers:

Alice Carter, Flathead Lake Biological Station, University of Montana, [email protected]
Heili Lowman, University of Nevada Reno, [email protected]
Betsy Summers, University of New Mexico, [email protected]
Lauren Koenig, Flathead Lake Biological Station, [email protected]
Bella Olesky, University of Wyoming, [email protected]
Matt Trentman, Flathead Lake Biological Station, [email protected]
Joanna BlaszczakUniversity of Nevada Reno, [email protected]

Title: Modelling aquatic ecosystems and food webs under global change

Abstract:

Climate change and increased frequency of extreme events have the potential to alter ecological relationships, from physical to chemical to biological interactions. Evaluating climate change impacts on aquatic ecosystems and trophic relationships can highlight vulnerable processes and dynamics that may be crucial to in the stability of these systems. Models can facilitate evaluation of alternative scenarios and changes in strengths of interactions. In this session, we will be exploring a variety of types of modelling of aquatic ecosystem dynamics and food webs across local, regional or global scales. We will focus on the uses of modelling to evaluate food web and ecosystem dynamics, energy flow within or across trophic levels, responses of biota to extreme events and responses to scenarios of climate change. Talks that evaluate the interactions of climate change and potential management, including remediation actions, are especially welcome. The goal of this session is to exchange ideas on potential climate change impacts and solutions as well as to showcase the many modelling techniques that can be employed to better understand dynamics in estuaries, streams, rivers, lakes, and reservoirs.

Organizers:

Christina Murphy, U.S. Geological Survey, Maine Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit and University of Maine, [email protected]
Sherri Johnson, USDA Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station, [email protected]
J. Andres Olivos, Oregon State University, Department of Fisheries, Wildlife and Conservation Science, [email protected]
Matthew Whiles, University of Florida, [email protected]

Resource Management

Title: Application of Digital Technology and Artificial Intelligence for Sustainability of Aquatic Resources

Abstract:

This session focuses on Aquatic resources Management using digital technology. Asia plays an important role in the global food security through aquaculture production, accounting for about 90 % of the global production. Asia is major producer of fisheries. Considering the surface and groundwater resources, shortage of water, cost involved in water storage and conveyance to the users, it is necessary to adopt innovative methods of conjunctive use of water for food from agricultural and aquaculture production using water effectively and efficiently. Aquaculture is an innovative tool in the urban and also in rural agriculture to use and reuse water as well as wastewater along with groundwater, brackish water, drainage water and coastal water. Although fish farming date back thousands of years, recent decades have witnessed an unprecedented expansion of aquatic resources. Serial depletions by areas, species and tropic level have led to world fish catch in decline. In order to maintain the productivity of aquatic ecosystems and improve dependent livelihoods, strategic planning, reforms in policies, institutional development and digital governance that foster sustainable and equitable and efficient use of aquatic resources need to be developed for food security. The presentations signifies that Digital Technology can be adopted for for Sustainability of Aquatic Resources to achieve the Sustainable development Goals on Food Security.

Organizers:

Somita Chaudhari, Vidyalankar Institute of Technology, [email protected]
Maria Cerreta, University of Naples “Federico II”,Naples, Italy., [email protected]

Title: Balancing benefits and socioenvironmental costs of water infrastructure projects

Abstract:

Globally widespread aquatic infrastructure such as dams, levees and culverts provide numerous benefits to people, including irrigation, water supply, electricity, flood control, and transportation. Yet aquatic infrastructure projects disrupt a suite of ecosystem services supported by natural, unregulated aquatic ecosystems. With projections of increasing living standards and continued population growth, an ever-growing demand for the services provided by water infrastructure is only expected to exacerbate the pressure on global aquatic ecosystems and the livelihoods of millions of people that directly depend on them. More than ever, our society necessitates science-based solutions for balancing the benefits and costs of existing and future portfolios of water infrastructure projects. This symposium will provide diverse perspectives reflecting advances, challenges, and avenues in the science behind coordinated construction, operation, and removal of water infrastructure.

Organizers:

Rafael Almeida, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley, [email protected]
Alex Flecker, Cornell University, [email protected]
Rafael Schmitt, Stanford University, [email protected]
Caroline Arantes, West Virginia University, [email protected]

Title: Catchment-Estuary Linkages to Improve Management

Abstract:

Estuaries are influenced by connection to the ocean, but also to adjacent ecosystems and upstream catchments. Because of their ecological and economic value, managers and researchers across the globe benefit from an improved understanding of how inputs from rivers, wetlands, and terrestrial landscapes influence ecological conditions and processes in estuaries. Information describing these relationships can guide management actions to improve the health of estuaries and enhance the services they provide. This session seeks to explore the physical, chemical, biological, and social connections that link estuaries with their catchments over scales of space (e.g., urban areas compared to upstream agriculture or forests) and/or time (e.g., past, present, future), with a focus on how research can inform management to improve estuary health. Presentation topics may include water quality/ biogeochemical relationships, trophic linkages, hydrodynamic estuary-river relationships, collaborative governance and management, and land use impacts on estuarine resources. Research methods may include historical trends analysis and predicting future conditions of estuary-catchment linkages; distinguishing effects of land use on estuarine indicators based on factors such as proximity, type, and season; or assessing values via surveys or administrative records. The goal of this session is to highlight how actions have affected, and can improve, estuarine systems to inform future decisionmaking.

Organizers:

Matthew Deitch, University of Florida, [email protected]
Tesfay Gebremicael, University of Florida, [email protected]

Title: Collaborative Solutions in Response to Harmful Algal Blooms

Abstract:

Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs) degrade water quality and ecosystem services, affecting socio ecological systems by deterring recreation, impacting fish, wildlife, domestic animal and human health. HABs require collaborative solutions to both management and research due to their multifaceted causes and effects. This session will highlight interdisciplinary applied research and collaborative management projects to improve the detection, forecasting, prevention, mitigation, and adaptation to freshwater and marine HABs. Potential topics include: decision support systems, monitoring, real time sensor networks, biomass and toxin modeling and forecasting, setting and achieving nutrient reduction or other HABs prevention targets, and research and development projects working towards these outcomes. Projects and research that show how new management actions and monitoring programs at local, state, provincial, or regional levels have been crafted in response to recent research are encouraged.

Organizers:

Ken Gibbons, Great Lakes Commission, [email protected]
Michelle Selzer, EGLE, [email protected]

Title: Development of a Binational Decadal-Scale Science Plan for the Great Lakes

Abstract:

New pressures are affecting the Laurentian Great Lakes – including climate change, novel chemical pollutants, urbanization, rapidly evolving agricultural practices, habitat loss, and impacts of invasive species to name a few – such that the Great Lakes system of today bears little resemblance to the one from the end of the last century.

The International Joint Commission’s Science Advisory Board (SAB) has demonstrated that there is a strong consensus among leaders in the Great Lakes research community that funding for scientific research has not kept pace with the need for fundamental, process-oriented investigation and exploration. In addition, the SAB recognizes the value of bridging multiple forms of knowledge, beyond traditional western-based scientific research.

Consequently, the SAB has developed a Great Lakes Science Plan through a collaborative process. This session will explore the components of the Science Plan as they relate to science priorities and research questions of individual lakes and connecting rivers, topics (physical processes, biogeochemical processes, food web dynamics, watershed dynamics, human dimensions), and the means to operationalize the Plan.

Organizers:

Matthew Child, International Joint Commission, [email protected]
Val Klump, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, [email protected]
Gail Krantzberg, McMaster University, [email protected]
Lizhu Wang, International Joint Commission, [email protected]
John Bratton, LimnoTech, [email protected]

Title: Great Lakes Connecting Waters: Research, Monitoring, and Progress

Abstract:

The Laurentian Great Lakes are linked by river and small lake systems known collectively as connecting waters or corridors. They include the St. Marys, St. Clair, Detroit, Niagara, and St. Lawrence Rivers. Portions of each of these connecting corridors have been designated as binational Great Lakes Areas of Concern due to impairment of beneficial uses and loss of ecosystem services. The riparian lands adjacent to these corridors were desirable for settlement because of direct access to water for transportation and industry. However, agricultural, urban and industrial activities have resulted in degraded environmental conditions due to contamination by associated pollutants, barriers, flow regulation, dredging, channel modifications, and exotic species invasions; all leading to habitat degradation and loss of critical aquatic ecosystem services, including wetlands and natural connectivity. Restoration and effective management of resources in the connecting waters involves inter-jurisdictional cooperation and collaboration. In this session, we will share research conducted and actions taken to address these impairments, including monitoring of measurable progress indicators. Topics of interest include fisheries, water and sediment quality, benthic ecology, habitat restoration, waterfowl, wetland, species at risk, and invasive species research, as well as monitoring in these important connecting systems.

Organizers:

Katie Stammler, Essex Region Conservation Authority, [email protected]
Michelle Selzer, EGLE, [email protected]
Susan Doka, DFO, [email protected]
Edward Roseman, USGS, [email protected]
David Zanatta, Central Michigan University, [email protected]
Robin DeBruyne, USGS, [email protected]
Michael TwissClarkson University, [email protected]
Jaqueline Serran, Detroit River Canadian Cleanup, [email protected]

Title: Invasive species collaboratives: Tackling invasive species problems through coordinated action

Abstract:

The introduction and establishment of aquatic invasive species has resulted in devastating economic, environmental, and social harm. If prevention and early detection programs fail to prevent establishment, a species-specific approach to controlling invaders is often required. Developing effective control methodologies requires intimate knowledge of the species and support from a variety of stakeholders. Frequently, gaps in knowledge and communication exists between research and management communities. Furthermore, management efforts are often disjointed and focused on small scales. Thus, collaboratives have formed to identify and make progress closing such gaps by aligning efforts.
Regional and national collaboratives have made significant headway in the control of aquatic invasive species. Their efforts, specifically project coordination and gap identification in species-specific management and research, have resulted in improved coordination between universities, organizations, and governments, leading to efficient and effective control programs. In this session, presenters will cover specific outcomes, research, and management programs informed by collaborative efforts to share information, prioritize needs, and identify best practices.

Organizers:

Samantha Tank, Great Lakes Commission, [email protected]
Erika Jensen, Great Lakes Commission, [email protected]
Kurt Kowalski, USGS – Great Lakes Science Center, [email protected]
Jon Hortness, USGS – Midcontinent Region, [email protected]

Title: Microbial Sand Contaminants – Implementation aspects

Abstract:

Good recreational water quality at a beach means that it is possible to bath with a negligible probability of becoming ill from exposure to waterborne pathogens. However, this does not tell the whole story since most of the time spent at the beach is not in the water. Sand became a subject of study a few decades ago, but the implementation of quality standards never took place until recently. The validation of the necessity to monitor sand happened in 2003, with the publication of the Guidelines for safe recreational water environments by the World Health Organisation. Since then, publications continued to emerge at a slow pace. Without clear recommendations of monitoring parameters and levels, water continued to be the focus of most national regulations for almost fifteen years. In 2012, a paper was published with the first report of health effects of contaminated sand, during an epidemiological study performed in the United States of America. In 2015, a broad white paper was published recommending methods and stating reasons for monitoring sand; and this year, the revised WHO guidelines added parameters and reference/limit values for enterococci and fungi. Other biological groups are referenced on a risk-assessment base. It’s now time to implement such recommendations and start building more knowledge on health-exposure effects and water quality protection

Organizers:

João Brandão, National Institute of Health (Portugal), [email protected]
Helena Solo-Gabriele, University of Miami, [email protected]

Title: Monitoring and Modeling Effects of Aquatic Barriers on River Ecosystems

Abstract:

Aquatic barriers, such as dams, river crossings, locks, and diversions, can broadly influence water quality, geomorphology, and biotic assemblages across large spatial scales. Episodic events such as severe storm events, sediment flushing, maintenance-related reservoir draw-down, or barrier removal may also trigger abrupt changes in the downstream aquatic and riparian ecosystems. Better understanding of the extent to which barriers, passage infrastructure, reservoir operations, or episodic events impact the ecosystem of a river will lead to better anticipation and mitigation of negative effects. This session brings together research on innovative techniques to provide more complete views of the impacts over various spatial and temporal scales. The use of in situ monitoring, remote sensing, or modeling (physical or data-driven) to identify the extent of these impacts can provide valuable feedback for improving the sustainability of reservoir and river management. Assessments of implemented or proposed changes to flow regulation are also encouraged, as well as approaches for monitoring the efficacy of fish, sediment, or recreational passage infrastructure.

Organizers:

Paul Matson, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, [email protected]
Carly Hansen, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, [email protected]
Mirko Musa, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, [email protected]

Title: New and persistent concerns for burned watersheds, aquatic ecosystems, and drinking water

Abstract:

Previous work has demonstrated that fires affect riparian vegetation and shading, water temperatures, geomorphometry, sedimentation and nutrient loading. These changes cascade into impacts on aquatic communities, including algae, invertebrates and fishes. Additionally, there are other less well-studied but potential emerging issues, including differences across aquatic ecosystem types, the mobilization of heavy metals or organic pollutants from natural or anthropogenic sources, chemical residuals from fire retardants and a possible linkage between fire, nutrients and harmful algal blooms. This special session brings together researchers and managers to 1) showcase leading-edge research on the physical, chemical and biological effects of fire on diverse aquatic ecosystems, 2) synthesize known effects, while identifying emerging issues and critical information gaps for future research; and 3) facilitate discussion among researchers and managers coordinating water quality monitoring, managing post-fire impacts and/or implementing mitigation measures.

Organizers:

Angela De Palma-Dow, County of Lake Water Resources Department, Lakeport, CA, [email protected]
Becky Bixby, University of New Mexico, Department of Biology, Albuquerque, NM, [email protected]
Stephen LeDuc, US Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC, [email protected]
Ian McCullough, Fisheries and Wildlife, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, [email protected]
Michael Paul, Tetra Tech Inc., Ecological Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC, [email protected]
Chuck Rhoades, US Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station, Fort Collins, CO, [email protected]

Title: Open Science for Collaborative Management of Aquatic Ecosystems

Abstract:

Environmental scientists are tasked with developing research products that communicate analysis of increasingly large and complex datasets to inform stakeholder that include other researchers, natural resource managers, and the public. Open science philosophies and tools have the potential to improve communication between scientists and these stakeholders, thereby increasing collaboration during research planning and implementation. Open science can make research more efficient and reproducible, and more responsive and accessible to a broad range of stakeholders. This symposium invites contributors to share examples of open science research techniques, processes, and products—especially examples that illustrate how using an open science approach facilitated collaboration between research scientists and natural resource managers. We encourage examples that demonstrate both the successes and challenges of applying open science to research workflows across a variety of management, institutional, and regulatory frameworks. These can include development of open decision-support tools (e.g., dashboards), processes for creating reproducible workflows of analysis products, and developing innovative methods for opening data that is findable, accessible, interoperable, and reusable. We invite regular, 15-minute contributed talks, 5-minute lightning talks, and/or poster presentations.

Organizers:

Alexandra Huddell, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, [email protected]
Marcus Beck, Tampa Bay Estuary Program, [email protected]
James Ammerman, Long Island Sound Study/NEIWPCC, [email protected]
James Hagy, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, [email protected]

Title: Operationalizing the science: Collaborating to put ecological theory into practice

Abstract:

•Aquatic ecosystems face numerous threats globally. These threats, including chemical contamination, drought, hydrologic alteration, climate change, drainage practices, and sedimentation, have large ramifications for aquatic and linked terrestrial ecosystems. Scientists who study these threats are often challenged to translate their findings in order to help others develop solutions. By translating our findings, we make our science operational or useful to others.
•Operationalizing science often involves interdisciplinary collaboration and at least one intended user. By its nature, interdisciplinary collaboration helps scientists to generalize their findings and translate theory to help create useful product(s). End products vary depending on the needs of the user, the nature of the problem, and the scope of the science.
•In this session, we will highlight efforts to 1) apply ecological theory to solve problems and 2) leverage interdisciplinary collaborations to develop tools used by practitioners, policy makers, and researchers. We welcome talks describing the outcome (products) of collaborative, translational efforts as well as on the process of developing these efforts.

Organizers:

Johanna Kraus, US Geological Survey, [email protected]
Kristin Skrabis, DOI Office of Policy Analysis, [email protected]
Jo Ellen Hinck, US Geological Survey, [email protected]

Title: Recent Advances in Wetland Delineation

Abstract:

Wetland delineation is inherently an interdisciplinary practice, requiring analysis of hydrology, soils, and vegetation; and technical approaches to wetland delineation have evolved over time based upon improvements in wetland science. Recent initiatives have resulted in the development of new tools and techniques designed to improve the accuracy and efficiency of wetland delineations efforts. Specifically, the session will communicate the findings of several recent studies investigating the use of paper test strips embedded with alpha-alpha dipyridyl dye and Indicator of Reduction in Soils (IRIS) devices to identify reducing conditions in hydric soils, and the application of water stained leaves as a field indicator of wetland hydrology. The Technical Standards for the identification or wetland hydrology, hydric soils, and hydrophytic vegetation will be introduced, along with new approaches to evaluate rainfall normality in a wetland delineation context. The development and application of automated wetland delineation data forms will also be discussed, in addition to updates from members of the National Technical Committee for Wetland Vegetation and the National Technical Committee for Hydric Soils. A panel discussion will follow the session, promoting an interactive dialogue between wetland delineation practitioners, academics, and students.

Organizers:

Jacob Berkowitz, US Army Corps of Engineers, [email protected]

Title: Revisiting the Freshwater Imperative: Accomplishments, Challenges, and Future Visions

Abstract:

The theme of the 2022 Joint Aquatic Sciences Meeting speaks to the heightened urgency about the impacts of environmental change on ecosystem services and the need for collaborative aquatic science and management. The complexity of these issues are not only related to the scientific knowledge, but also the policy tools that are needed to accomplish sustainable management of freshwater resources.

Three decades ago, a similar concern about the need for sustainable management of freshwater resources led to the development of The Freshwater Imperative. The Freshwater Imperative was a comprehensive research agenda designed to lead to a predictive understanding of freshwater ecosystems, through improving detection, assessment, and forecasting, as well as developing management and mitigation scenarios for potential environmental change. Just after the 25th anniversary of its publication, we reflect back on what aquatic scientists have accomplished, what we have missed, and what lessons we have learned that can be applied to preparing for current rapid changes and future environmental crises.

Organizers:

Catherine OReilly, Illinois State University, [email protected]
Kathryn Cottingham, Dartmouth College, [email protected]
Erin Hotchkiss, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, [email protected]
Steven Sadro, University of California-Davis, [email protected]
Michael Vanni, Miami University of Ohio, [email protected]

Title: Science for Management of Midcontinent Wetlands: Monitoring, Mapping, Modeling and More 

Abstract:

Management of grassland and wetland ecosystems that serve as the primary migratory bird breeding habitat in the Central and Mississippi River flyways of North America is transnational effort for agencies in both the USA and Canada. These grassland and wetland ecosystems have been highly modified and impacted by agricultural intensification and extreme climatic. Understanding how these drivers interact is critical for scientifically informed investment of conservation and restoration dollars. Decades of long-term monitoring of midcontinent wetlands has enabled the development of statistical and mechanistic models and mapping of wetland surface water and vegetation dynamics through rapidly advancing remote sensing technologies. With the evolution of computational resources, machine-learning techniques, and globally available geospatial datasets, there have been many advances towards assessing the accuracy of different mapping and modeling products and the utility for wetland managers. In this symposium we will explore recent advances in fusing data, mapping, and modeling techniques with the direct aim of assisting management agencies to accomplish a variety of habitat management and water quality goals.

Organizers:

Owen McKenna, USGS Northern Prairie Wildlife Research Center, [email protected]

Title:

Status and Future Outlook for the Management of Invasive Aquatic Plants and Harmful Algae

Abstract:

As with the evolution of our sciences, emerging threats to our water resources are forever changing, and with that change comes the need for more research, adapted strategies, and advanced solutions. The science of aquatic plant management is a well-founded discipline addressing various national and international issues, centered around the potential environmental, social, and
economic impacts of invasive and noxious aquatic plants and algae. Although often considered a niche space by some, the science is rooted in interdisciplinary study driven by various academic institutions, industry, all levels of government, and NGOs worldwide. Our synthesis speaker will introduce the audience to the history, methodologies, and future of aquatic plant and algae management, ultimately serving as a primer for subsequent talks in this symposium. A synopsis of various methods of control, discussions of integrated management strategies, and introduction to the wide-reaching impacts of invasive and/or noxious aquatic plants and algae will be given. Subsequent speakers will shed light on the complexities of developing management plans that meet various water user needs, considerations made for sensitive species, provide exploration of regulatory roles and responsibilities, and explore emerging concerns in the science. Ultimately, the goal of this symposium is to stimulate discussion of shared goals of other societies and help identify potential areas of cooperation and collaboration.

Organizers:

Brett Hartis, Aquatic Plant Management Society, [email protected]
Matt Johnson, Midwest Aquatic Plant Management Society, [email protected]

Title: The Clean Water Act at 50

Abstract:

The Clean Water Act was one of the landmark policy achievements of the American environmental movement of the 1960s. It has remained the primary policy protecting and governing waters of the U.S. in the 50 years since its passage. While the Clean Water Act has generally been considered a success with limiting industrial pollution, other problematic issues have persisted, such as agricultural non-point source pollution, emerging contaminants, and cohesively managing interstate waters. Even the seemingly basic issue of what waters are covered under the jurisdiction of the Act has been a source of continued controversy. Issues such as climate change, environmental justice, and threats to freshwater biodiversity raise the question of whether or not the Clean Water Act is equipped to deal with the challenges of the 21st Century. This session will serve as a forum for a broad retrospective on the legacy, successes, and failures of the Clean Water Act. The session will also provide a forward-looking assessment of near- and far-term challenges to water resources, with the goal of identifying creative and effective ways to address those challenges within the context of the Clean Water Act. We welcome diverse perspectives from a range of scholars, including legal experts, practitioners, social scientists, and physical scientists.

Organizers:

Mitchell Owens, Indiana University, [email protected]
Todd Royer, Indiana University, [email protected]
Joe Morgan, US EPA, [email protected]
Mark Rains, , [email protected]
Lyndon Lee, , [email protected]

Title: Towards environmental flow implementation for a sustainable water future

Abstract:

Securing environmental flows (e-flows) — the quantity, timing, and quality of freshwater flows and levels necessary to sustain aquatic ecosystems which, in turn, support human cultures, economies, sustainable livelihoods, and well-being — is now globally accepted as a pre-requisite to socio-environmental sustainability. E-flow principles and stipulations are found in laws, policies and regulations across the world. This widespread adoption of e-flows was aided by major advances in our understanding of the influence of flow on aquatic processes and the improvement of e-flow assessment frameworks. However, e-flow implementation remains uneven and continued progress is needed to secure e-flows for both ecosystems and human cultures globally. To address these challenges, the 2018 Brisbane Declaration and Global Action Agenda on E-Flows made 35 actionable recommendations for legislation and regulation, water management programs, and research. This multidisciplinary session invites contributions that follow up on these recommendations to support and advance e-flow implementation. We welcome contributions from all perspectives on environmental freshwater flows and levels, from the stream reach to the global scale, and from innovative case studies of e-flow implementation or limnological applications to advances in e-flow frameworks for sustaining human cultures. We particularly encourage submissions that feature collaborative solutions across disciplines, stakeholders, and cultures.

Organizers:

Mathis Messager, Department of Geography, McGill University, Montreal, Canada & RiverLY, INRAE, Villeurbanne, France, [email protected]
Rebecca Tharme, RiverFutures, Cressbrook, Derbyshire, UK, [email protected]
Bernhard Lehner, Department of Geography, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada, [email protected]
Thibault Datry, RiverLY research unit, INRAE, Villeurbanne, France, [email protected]

Title: Uncommon Dialogue – A Rare Opportunity for Collaboration Between Typical Opponents

Abstract:

An ‘Uncommon Dialogue’ process is underway. It was co-convened by Stanford’s Woods Institute for the Environment and Steyer-Taylor Center for Energy Policy and Finance, and the Energy Futures Initiative. The “Joint Statement of Collaboration on U.S. Hydropower: Climate Solution and Conservation Challenge” was signed by such high profile environmental organizations as American Rivers, World Wildlife Fund, Union of Concerned Scientists, Hydropower Reform Coalition, and American Whitewater. The root of this is in climate change through actions that will improve rivers and promote renewable energy. Signatories see opportunities under the so-called ‘3 R’s’ – Removal of dams; Rehabilitation of dams for safety and environmental mitigation; and Retrofitting of powered and non-powered dams to increase renewable energy generation and improve environmental performance. Seven Work Groups, comprising representatives from a broad spectrum of interests are working on action plans and developing legislative language that will be submitted through various avenues for consideration by Congress. All the activities are under the umbrella of the ‘3 R’s’. Representatives from the environmental and hydropower communities will present their experiences and objectives and then a panel/audience discussion will be moderated. The Uncommon Dialogue has demonstrated that interest groups that are often adversarial can work together for common beneficial outcomes.

Organizers:

Tim Brush, Inter-Fluve, Inc., [email protected]

Title: Wet & salty: coastal ecosystem science and management under rising tides

Abstract:

Accelerated sea level rise is rapidly altering coastal landscapes. Rising sea levels alter biogeochemical processes and change the structure and function of aquatic ecosystems, as well as increase nuisance flooding and saltwater intrusion in coastal communities. Farmlands, cities, and human infrastructure (eg: dams, roads, culverts, drainage canals) alter coastal hydrology, the delivery and export of sediment and nutrients, and marsh transgression dynamics, increasing the complexity of sea level-induced changes to aquatic ecosystems. We clearly need creative solutions that span the physical, natural, and social sciences to meet these challenges and invite presentations that examine the science and management of coastal aquatic ecosystems in a wetter and saltier future.

Our symposium welcomes researchers and managers who are addressing sea level rise-induced changes with collaborative solutions. We seek presentations that consider challenges for a range of ecosystems (forested wetlands, salt marshes, riverine wetlands, streams & rivers, urban or agricultural waterways, lakes, ponds, reservoirs), landscape configurations (natural, agricultural, urban), and management solutions (passive/active restoration, watershed and community planning, conservation and preservation). Our symposium aims to bring together diverse perspectives and disciplines to critically evaluate the challenges and opportunities of coastal science and management.

Organizers:

Beth Lawrence, University of Connecticut, [email protected]
Ashley Helton, University of Connecticut, [email protected]
Havalend Steinmuller, Florida State University, [email protected]

Title: Wetlands for Nutrient Management: Building a Framework for Science-Based Restoration

Abstract:

Wetland ecosystems are increasingly being conserved, enhanced, restored, constructed, and managed for the specific purpose of nutrient removal to mitigate downstream eutrophication. For example, the State of Ohio recently implemented a multi-million dollar long-term investment in over 57 wetland restoration projects, with the explicit purpose of reducing harmful algal blooms as part of the H2Ohio Initiative. However, efforts to optimize ecosystem service value from these “working wetlands” remain inadequately informed due to fundamental knowledge and understanding gaps in how within-wetland hydrobiogeochemical processes transport, transform, store, and/or release nutrients, particularly in disturbed, managed, and engineered systems. This symposium will explore the state of the science of working wetland nutrient biogeochemistry, opportunities and challenges posed by the science-management partnerships required to effectively study and implement working wetlands as nutrient removal infrastructure, and best practices for building science-based long term monitoring frameworks to support policy and decision making.

Organizers:

Janice Kerns, ODNR Old Woman Creek National Estuarine Research Reserve, [email protected]
Lauren Kinsman-Costello, Kent State University, [email protected]
Robert Midden, Bowling Green State University, [email protected]
Kevin McCluney, Bowling Green State University, [email protected]
Raissa Mendonca, Kent State University, [email protected]
Laura Johnson, Heidelberg University, [email protected]
Stephen JacqueminWright State University, [email protected]
Steve McMurray, ODNR Old Woman Creek National Estuarine Research Reserve, [email protected]

Science Communication/Education

Title: Adventures, Challenges, and Benefits of Conducting International Collaborative Research

Abstract:

Aquatic sciences are increasingly global in nature, transcending political boundaries and requiring collaboration with foreign scientists and working in other countries. Planning and executing collaborative research projects overseas, however, is not trivial. Challenges include communicating with scientists in a different country, obtaining funding for international work, overcoming technical obstacles such as shipping and permits, and navigating language and cultural barriers. The recent global pandemic has added a new layer of challenge to carrying out international research. We invite participants of all career stages to share their experiences from both productive and not so successful adventures in conducting international collaborative research.
We seek presentations on international collaboration related to funding, identifying collaborators, executing projects, overcoming obstacles, developing teams, leveraging mutual advantages and infrastructure, handling difficulties, and successful outcomes. The session will include submissions by students participating in ASLO’s NSF-funded program “Limnology and Oceanography Research Exchange (LOREX)” which aims to foster international research collaborations through professional development and a research exchange for graduate students. We hope this session will help others avoid pitfalls, take advantage of opportunities, and increase likelihood of effective and fun international collaborations in the aquatic sciences.

Organizers:

Brittany Schieler, Association for the Sciences of Limnology and Oceanography, [email protected]
Adina Paytan, University of California Santa Cruz, [email protected]
Mike Pace, University of Virginia, [email protected]
Linda Duguay, University of Southern California, [email protected]

Title: Communicating Science in an Ever Changing World

Abstract:

Ultimately, the goal for this group of speakers would be to bring real world working examples of scientific communication from traditional and non-traditional educators working with the public (K through grey). As program elements can be met easier and are more effective when the public understands the problems facing our environment, it is important for scientists to learn how to effectively tell their story to create well informed residents. While traditional in-person education is important, new virtual options have become available that will allow scientific communicators to work with more people than ever. I hope to find a mixture of speakers to discuss benefits and lessons learned of educational programs that worked, programs that failed, communicators that are focusing on equity and educators that are constantly trying to push the boundary of what can be done utilizing new ideas and techniques.

Organizers:

Danielle Wynne, Fairfax County Watershed Education and Outreach, [email protected]
Chris Mueller, Fairfax County Watershed Education and Outreach, [email protected]

Title: How Professional Science Societies Can Promote Diversity, Equity, Inclusion & Justice

Abstract:

Professional scientific societies can play an important role in engaging young scientists and creating opportunities that lead to STEM careers. As a gateway for their members to engage in professional development opportunities and advance their careers, science societies are uniquely positioned to broaden participation of marginalized and minoritized communities in STEM. Scientific societies are also themselves a product of decades of exclusionary practices in history and tradition. The CASS partners societies represented at JASM gather to share strategies for breaking down barriers, as well as programs that broaden participation and enhance retention within our organizations. In this symposium, we aim to foster cross-society discussions on strategies, best practices, and success stories from society leadership, representatives, and members, as well as engage in dialogue on how to overcome current challenges and facilitate cultural change, so that we can initiate effective collective action towards diversity, equity, and inclusion within the societies.

Organizers:

Brittany Schieler, Association for the Sciences of Limnology and Oceanography, [email protected]
Vanessa Lougheed, University of Texas at El Paso, [email protected]

Title: Lessons on Leadership and Mentorship: Tips and Stories

Abstract:

Building a strong network and developing leadership skills are essential to a successful career at any stage. However, it takes a concerted effort to find helpful mentors, improve mentorship skills, and be an effective leader. The Women in Wetlands Section of the Society of Wetland Scientists will present a symposium featuring diverse speakers who will share tips and discuss how they have learned to grow as leaders and mentors in different work environments and at multiple career stages. Topics will include being a constructive mentor at different career stages, finding effective mentors at various stages in your career and different work environments, leading as a minority, and being an inclusive leader. We will also organize a panel discussion for our topic. This symposium supports the key mission of the Women in Wetlands Section to facilitate professional development for wetland scientists.

Organizers:

Rachel Schultz, SUNY Brockport, [email protected]
Jennifer Karberg, Nantucket Conservation Foundation, [email protected]
Carrie Reinhardt Adams, University of Florida, [email protected]
Brianna Hines, , [email protected]

Title: Working in Wetlands: The People, Planet and Profit Edition-Collaboration Required

Abstract:

With surmounting conservation challenges aquatic systems face and non-linear career paths becoming more common, support for scientists and practitioners is more important than ever before. Working in Wetlands, hosted by the South Central Chapter, Education Section, and Student Section of the Society of Wetland Scientists, is a multidisciplinary session aimed at advancing and sharing best practices in career development to grow as a community. Now in its third annual installment, the symposium features diverse stories of the skills necessary to respond to a rapidly evolving career and global landscape. With the joint meeting’s theme in mind, it will highlight careers from the aquatic sciences with a major focus on collaboration between the three pillars of sustainability: People (behavioral sciences, outreach and education, science communication, etc.), Planet (natural sciences, research, conservation, etc.) and Profit (consulting, mitigation banking, tech, etc.). Speakers will draw from their experiences in the private sector, government, academia, and non-profits to showcase the diversity of tools needed to excel in the aquatic sciences. Invited presenters will come from diverse backgrounds and include a combination of professionals, students, and recent graduates working in a variety of fields within the aquatic sciences.

Organizers:

Amber Robinson, Society of Wetland Scientists South Central Chapter, [email protected]
Steffanie Munguia, Society of Wetland Scientists Student Section, [email protected]

Social Science and Communication

Title: How applied is your research? Engaging communities for enhanced relevance

Abstract:

Community-engaged research (CEnR) is a well-established method of project conceptualization and data collection; one which links researcher and community. CEnR is collaboratively designed to ensure participation from communities affected by the issue studied. Because the public is actively engaged, CEnR projects often lead to scientific findings that are immediately applicable and accepted by communities. These collaborations can take on many forms along a continuum of public engagement. This includes community informed research (as advisor), community involved research (as participant) and community directed research (as leader). While community informed research is typically driven by academic interests, community directed research is often initiated from community concerns. Originally implemented in the healthcare field to address health inequalities within marginalized communities, a foundational premise of CEnR is that the more integrated the community is in the research process, the more relevant and applicable research findings will be. Here we examine this approach applied to aquatic sciences. This session will explore projects addressing a variety of issues that demonstrate points along the CEnR spectrum, covering topics such as sustainable fisheries, coastal resilience, and ecosystem health. Throughout this session of invited and contributed presentations, the successes and pitfalls of CEnR will be investigated, thus providing a forum for discussion.

Organizers:

Elizabeth Staugler, Florida Sea Grant / University of Florida, [email protected]
Chiara Zuccarino-Crowe, Michigan Sea Grant, [email protected]
Elizabeth Rohring, National Sea Grant Office, [email protected]

Title: What’s in a (Species) Name? Language and Metaphor in Aquatic Ecology

Abstract:

Technical vocabulary, the use of metaphor, and other linguistic considerations are key aspects of communicating about aquatic ecology to fellow researchers and the public. While the thoughtful use of language and metaphor can inspire new scientific insights and public support for research, poorly-chosen rhetoric can cause confusion and even undermine the goals of inclusive science. In recent years, there has been a push to critically examine the use of language and metaphor in environmental science, from the initiative to change the common name of the moth Lymantria dispar to challenging the militaristic metaphors often used to teach the public about invasive species. This session will feature presentations on the use of specific language and metaphor in aquatic ecology, and welcomes talks focused on proposed changes to species names or technical terminology, development of effective metaphors in outreach material, communication challenges surrounding management decisions for native or invasive species, or any other relevant intersection of rhetoric and environmental science. Talks can focus on specific species, issues, or geographic regions, but should be framed to promote discussion of broader implications and transferability.

Organizers:

El Lower, Michigan Sea Grant, [email protected]

Other

Title: Bold Award Session

Abstract:

The Bold Award session has been a tradition to the Phycological Society of America Annual Meeting dating back to 1974. This session features graduate student members of PSA presenting the results of their completed dissertation or thesis research, with the Bold Award given to the best presentation as judged by the Bold Award committee. The award typically takes the form of a $1000 prize provided by the society and special article consideration in the Journal of Phycology to disseminate their work. In past years, there have been anywhere from 6-15 participants. This session is typically held early in the conference schedule, to allow time for the judges to decide on a winner to announce later in the conference. Ideally the session is also held at a time without additional concurrent sessions, so the students have the full attention of the meeting attendees to display their knowledge, skills, and research. As such, this session tends to be one of the more well-attended sessions at the annual PSA meeting. Graduate students who are PSA members, regardless of nationality, are eligible to compete for the Bold Award, as well as former students within twelve months of completion of their degree. Please see psaalgae.org for eligibility requirements.

Organizers:

Matt Ashworth, University of Texas, Austin, [email protected]

Title: PSA Presidential Symposium

Abstract: 

Marine and freshwater ecosystems are being altered dramatically by climate change and other anthropogenic drivers such as pollution, land use changes, water management, and destructive fishing. In many ecosystems, the rate of climate and environmental change is outpacing rates of organismal adaptation. This symposium will explore ways in which algal research (basic and applied) can contribute to conservation and management efforts. Talks in this symposium will range from cells to communities and across the aquatic salinity gradient (marine to fresh water), including research efforts using and controversies of “assisted evolution.”

Organizers:

Deborah Robertson, Clark University, [email protected]

Contributed Session Topics

Session NumberTitle
CON01Aquatic Ecology
CON02Biodiversity, DNA and Ecosystem Function
CON03Biogeochemistry
CON04Biossessment
CON05Cell and Molecular
CON06Climate Change and Adaptation
CON07Community Ecology
CON08Disturbance/Fragmentation
CON09Ecological Modeling
CON10Economics/Human Dimensions
CON11Ecosystem Services
CON12Ecotoxicology
CON13Education
CON14Evolution
CON15Food Web
CON16Genetics
CON17Habitat and Species
CON18Harmful Algae and Eutrophication
CON19Hydrodynamics/physical processes
CON20Hydroecology
CON21Land-use and Non-point Source
CON22Management and Policy
CON23Microbial Ecology
CON24Molecular Ecology
CON25Non-native Species
CON34Other
CON26Physiology / Physiological Ecology
CON27Population Ecology
CON28Primary and Secondary Production
CON29Regulated Water Systems
CON30Remote Sensing and Sensory Technology
CON31Resilience
CON32Restoration/Conservation
CON33Taxonomy