Pre-registration is required for all workshop/professional development sessions. Please be sure to sign up when you register for JASM 2022.

Title: Clean Water Protection Around the World

Date/Time: Sunday, May 15, 1:00 – 5:00 pm

Registration Fee:

              Student/Early Career:  $ 15.00

              Professional:  $ 25.00

Abstract:

Water quality laws are designed to protect the environment. These laws are informed by robust science and are continually evolving through the development of regulations. Scientists wishing to understand the relevance of their work with respect to laws and regulations can benefit from an understanding of those laws. This workshop will introduce the major Clean Water laws protecting aquatic ecosystems in a cross-section of JASM member countries, including the Clean Water Act in the US, the Clean Water Act and Environmental Protection Act in Canada, and the Water Framework Directive in Europe. In addition, we will discuss issues which are currently in great flux in different countries and compare and contrast how these issues are being resolved.We will include the concept of “jurisdictional waters” (and their determination) and the recent experiences with WOTUS in the US and what might be next.

Organizers:

Michael Paul, Tetra Tech Inc., Ecological Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC, [email protected]
Society for Freshwater Science Science and Policy Committee, Society for Freshwater Science, [email protected]

Title: Collection, Identification, Ecology and Control of Freshwater Algae

Date/Time: Sunday, May 15, 8:00 am – 5:00 pm

Registration Fee:

              Student/Early Career:  $ 25.00

              Professional:  $ 75.00

Abstract:

Algae are an important part of a properly functioning natural aquatic system, but when algae become abundant, water uses and habitat are often impaired. All algae were not created equal and proper identification is important to determining management strategy. With recent apparent increases in toxic algae and issues with taste and odor, understanding algae has become even more important. This workshop is intended to provide information on how to collect and recognize common genera within major groups of algae, with emphasis on taxonomic detail and identification approaches for planktonic algae. Participants are encouraged to bring any algae samples with which they would like identification help. The workshop will be taught by Ann St. Amand, Ken Wagner, and Andrew Chapman. They are experienced algal taxonomists and ecologists working in applied fields. Collectively they have many years of experience assessing algal problems, evaluating impacts and causes of algal nuisances, and developing algal management programs.

This workshop includes a much more in depth look at methodology and specific algal divisions. Recent changes to taxonomy will be discussed as well as differences in approaches to taxonomic classification. Participants are strongly encouraged to bring their own samples for analysis and there will be live collected material available. There will be time to discuss any specific taxonomic and management issues that are encountered in your system.

Organizers:

Ann St Amand, PhycoTech, Inc., [email protected]
Ken Wagner, Water Resources, [email protected]
Andy Chapman, Greenwater Laboratory, [email protected]

Title: Communicating Data through Graphics and Visualization

Date/Time: Sunday, May 15, 8:00 am – 12:00 pm

Registration Fee:

              Student/Early Career: $ 10.00

              Professional:  $ 25.00

Abstract:

Graphical abstracts and popular media increasingly rely on effective visuals to communicate scientific results. Even within scientific publications and proposals, graphs and conceptual figures are often a primary component of communicating the document’s key points. As ecologists work with increasingly large datasets, designing effective visuals to communicate our results becomes increasingly challenging. In this workshop, we will explore datasets of stoichiometric ratio data from aquatic ecosystems to learn new tools about designing effective graphics and visualizations for large ecological datasets. Participants will work in the R computing environment to create visualizations of public data but are also encouraged to bring their own datasets or conceptual problems to consider if they would like. Some modest familiarity with the R computing environment would be helpful, but participants with no prior experience are encouraged to reach out to the workshop organizers.

Organizers:

Marc Madigan, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, [email protected]
Eric Moody, Middlebury College, [email protected]
Hal Halvorson, University of Central Arkansas, [email protected]
Jessica Corman, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, [email protected]

Title: Designing Ecological Restoration Goals and Objectives to be ‘Climate-Smart’

Date/Time: Sunday, May 15, 8:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Registration Fee:

              Student/Early Career: $15.00

              Professional: $25.00

Abstract:

This is a workshop for ecological restoration project planners seeking guidance on how to develop quantitative objectives that consider not only realized, but also predicted impacts resulting from changing Great Lakes regional climate patterns. Participants will develop and document goal and objective statements that articulate an informed understanding of the predicted and evidentiary effects of climate change – vital to demonstrate that project success is ‘climate-smart.’ Practical exercises, including experiences shared by participants, will be used to facilitate discussion on identifying components of project design for the restoration of aquatic and wetland systems susceptible to extreme weather events. Discussion will include critique of adaptive management and its applicability as a tool to mitigate uncertainty in predicting climate change effects on project outcomes. The principles and applications of quality assurance and quality control and how they can reduce uncertainty will be integrated throughout the workshop. The instructors of this course are co-authors of the publication “Application of Quality Assurance and Quality Control Principles to Ecological Restoration Project Monitoring”, EPA-905-K-19-001 (https://www.glri.us/node/250) published by the USEPA Great Lakes National Program Office and the Interagency Ecological Restoration Quality Committee. This course is provided under EPA contract (EP-C-17-024) in support of the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative.

Organizers:

Brick Fevold, GDIT, [email protected]

Timothy Lewis, GDIT, [email protected]

Cynthia Collier, GDIT, [email protected]

Louis Blume, EPA-GLNPO, [email protected]

Title: Exploring NEON: Aquatic Instrument Data

Date/Time: Sunday, May 15, 1:00 – 5:00 pm

Registration Fee:

              Student/Early Career:  $ 15.00

              Professional:  $ 25.00

Abstract:

The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) is a National Science Foundation funded project designed to collect long-term, open-access data to better understand ecological change at continental scales. NEON includes 34 freshwater aquatic field sites spread across 19 different ecoclimatic regions, from Puerto Rico to Alaska. These sites are instrumented with an array of automated sensors collecting meteorological, hydrological and biogeochemical data at high-frequencies. This data is made publicly available to prospective users through the NEON data portal. This workshop will teach participants how access, interpret, manipulate and visualize this data; a basic familiarity with R is required.

Organizers:

Bobby Hensley, National Ecological Observatory Network, [email protected]
Guy Litt, National Ecological Observatory Network, [email protected]

Title: Exploring NEON: Biodiversity Data

Date/Time: Sunday, May 15, 8:00 am – 12:00 pm

Registration Fee:

              Student/Early Career:  $ 15.00

              Professional:  $ 25.00

Abstract:

The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) provides open ecological data from 81 locations across the United States. NEON data cover a wide range of subject areas within ecology, including organismal observations, biogeochemistry, remote sensing, and micrometeorology. This workshop will focus on NEON biodiversity data collected from our 34 aquatic sites, including 24 wadeable streams, 3 rivers, and 7 lakes. Instruction will include an overview of the breadth of NEON organismal data available for taxonomic groups such as fishes, benthic macroinvertebrates, and algae, before providing code-along instruction on how to access and work with NEON organismal data products. We will provide guidance on how to convert NEON data into standardized formats that can be used with a variety of R packages commonly used to analyze biodiversity data. Examples will include calculating Jost (2007)-style alpha, beta, and gamma diversity metrics and plotting ordinations using the vegan package (https://cran.r-project.org/package=vegan). Additionally, participants will learn about data discovery and visualization tools available in the ecocomDP package (https://cran.r-project.org/package=ecocomDP). At the end of the workshop, time will be reserved for participants to work with the NEON data of their choice with instructors present to address any questions that arise while working with the individual data sets; a basic familiarity with R is required for participation in the workshop.

Organizers:

Eric Sokol, Battelle, National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON), [email protected]
Stephanie Parker, Battelle, National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON), [email protected]

Title: Getting Published: A Workshop for Aquatic Scientists

Date/Time: Sunday, May 15, 1:00 – 5:00 pm

Registration Fee:

              Student/Early Career:  $ 15.00

              Professional:  $ 25.00

Abstract:

Most scientists are expected to publish their research, and career advancement often depends on how frequently and well we publish. However, completing a technically sound research project does not guarantee it will be published. Manuscripts need to target an appropriate audience and tell an interesting story. In this workshop, I will cover how to select the most appropriate journal for your paper and ways to improve the likelihood that your manuscript will be accepted. The specific topics we will cover include: (1) selecting a journal – it may not be Science or Nature, (2) the life history of a submitted manuscript including dealing with reviewers and editors, and (3) the elements of effective scientific writing (clarity and economy). The third topic will include writing for the reader; beyond IMRD – organizing Introduction, Methods, Results, and Discussion sections so they tell a compelling and easily understood story; effective use of citations (less can be more); good paragraphs – unified, cohesive, and developed, sentences and word choice – the syntax and grammar stuff you learned in high school (maybe) and then forgot (apparently almost everybody); and where to get additional help (self-help resources).

The workshop will include time for participant questions.

Organizers:

Charles Hawkins, Utah State University, [email protected]

Title: Macroinvertebrates.org: An open educational tool and training resource.

Date/Time: Sunday, May 15, 8:00 am – 12:00 pm

Registration Fee:

              Student/Early Career:  $ 15.00

              Professional:  $ 25.00

Abstract:

Macroinvertebrates.org is the product of a National Science Foundation funded web-based project titled ‘Learning to See, Seeing to Learn.’ The purpose of this website is to provide high-quality resources for training citizen scientists to identify aquatic macroinvertebrates with confidence and accuracy for water quality monitoring projects. This open educational resource is a powerful supplement to more-traditional identification keys typically used by volunteers. The tool features zoomable, high-res photography of the 150 most commonly found freshwater taxa in the Eastern United States with annotated diagnostic characters for 50 selected taxa at the order, family, and genus levels. Detailed descriptions of the diagnostic characters, life history, food preferences, ecological information, pollution tolerance values, and terminology supports are also provided to aid identification. Through this hands-on, minds-on workshop, participants will experience the many enhanced digital tools for identifying aquatic benthic macroinvertebrates to Order and some Family levels. Presenters will also provide an engaging presentation on the background and history of this project and the importance of understanding the needs to support and improve volunteer-level identification. Further time will be provided to explore the website with guided activities as well as time for the user to explore on their own. Additional resources to compliment the website will be presented as well.

Organizers:

Michael Broomall, Stroud Water Research Center, [email protected]
Tara Muenz, Stroud Water Research Center, [email protected]

Title: Macrosystems EDDIE: Teaching Ecological Forecasting to Undergraduates

Date/Time: Sunday, May 15, 1:00 – 5:00 pm

Registration Fee:

              Student/Early Career:  $ 15.00

              Professional:  $ 25.00

Abstract:

Ecological forecasting is an emerging approach which provides an estimate of the future state of an ecological system with uncertainty, allowing society to better manage important ecosystem services. Ecological forecasts are a powerful test of the scientific method because ecologists make a hypothesis of how an ecological system works; embed their hypothesis in a model; use the model to make a forecast of future conditions; and then assess the accuracy of their forecast, which indicates if their hypothesis is supported or needs to be updated. Consequently, freshwater ecologists are increasingly using ecological forecasts to predict how ecosystems are changing, but to date there have been few opportunities for receiving training in ecological forecasting at the undergraduate level.
Our team is developing teaching modules to teach the foundational concepts of ecological forecasting to undergraduates with R Shiny apps as part of the Macrosystems EDDIE (Environmental Data-Driven Inquiry & Exploration; MacrosystemsEDDIE.org). We use large, publicly-available freshwater datasets from NEON and GLEON to engage students in ecology and improve their quantitative reasoning. Each module can be adapted for use in introductory, intermediate, and advanced courses to enhance students’ understanding of freshwater ecology, macrosystems ecology, and ecological forecasting. In this workshop, we will provide an overview of the Macrosystems EDDIE modules to instructors.

Organizers:

Tadhg Moore, Virginia Tech, [email protected]
Cayelan Carey, Virginia Tech, [email protected]
Whitney Woelmer, Virginia Tech, [email protected]

Title: NSF LEAPS CASS IDEA Audit Tool Workshop (Invite Only)

Date/Time: Sunday, May 15, 8:00 am – 5:00 pm

Registration Fee:

              Student/Early Career:  Invite only              Professional: Invite only

Abstract:

This project will bring together representatives from the Consortium of Aquatic Science Societies (CASS), as well as invited representatives from scientific societies and organizations that that advance the participation people traditional underrepresented in STEM, to begin to examine the practices, procedures, and policies within scientific societies that create and perpetuate barriers to participation. This process will include development of an inclusivity, diversity, equity, and access (IDEA) audit tool. The IDEA audit tool will be constructed to be able to identify (1) policies and procedures that perpetuate status quo culture, policies, and procedures (2) specific barriers to broadening participation to diverse populations, specifically Black and Indigenous people of color communities from Tribal Colleges and Historically Black Colleges and Universities, and (3) practices and programs that have been successful within the CASS societies. The audit tool will be developed over the course of a year through a series of facilitated meetings and workshops. This process will include an in-person workshop meeting at the Joint Aquatic Sciences Meeting (JASM), as well as a series of remote meetings both before and after the in-person meeting. All participants will be invited or nominated by their home society.

Organizers:

Robin Kodner, Western Washington University, [email protected]
Gisele Muller-Parker, Delaware State University, [email protected]

Title: Teaching Quantitative Reasoning Using Data: Project EDDIE

Date/Time: Sunday, May 15, 8:00 am – 12:00 pm

Registration Fee:

              Student/Early Career:  $ 15.00

              Professional:  $ 25.00

Abstract:

Summarizing, condensing, displaying, and communicating quantitative data remains a persistent challenge in undergraduate science education. The emergence of large, long-term and sensor-based datasets provides an opportunity to engage students in engaging with environmental challenges through open-ended exploration and interpretation.
In this workshop we will consider what it takes to be ready to teach quantitative reasoning with data in your course including: consideration of how to fit quantitative reasoning experiences into a syllabus, generating learning goals, and setting the context in a class so students are primed to be successful. We will also explore how your learning outcomes can be met using Project EDDIE teaching modules.
Project EDDIE is an NSF funded effort engaging faculty from a range of institution types to create flexible classroom modules that aim to expose undergraduate students to real-world experiences. The growing collection of modules includes topics in limnology, phenology, climateology, soil science, and hydrology and is freely available online. This workshop will include presentations, small-group work time, opportunity to explore the Project EDDIE modules and active discussions. Participants will leave with an individual action plan. Workshop participants will be asked to bring a laptop and complete a pre-workshop survey. More information about Project EDDIE: https://serc.carleton.edu/185645

Organizers:

Cailin Orr, SERC at Carleton College, [email protected]

Title: The Neotoma Paleoecology Database (Part I): Overview and exploration

Date/Time: Sunday, May 15, 8:00 am – 12:00 pm

Registration Fee:

              Student/Early Career:  $ 10.00

              Professional:  $ 25.00

Abstract:

The Neotoma Paleoecology Database (neotomadb.org) is a valuable resource to find paleoecological study sites in a region, download data, view stratigraphic diagrams, select sites for new combined calibration datasets, discover distributions of taxa, and use data to understand regional long-term ecological shifts related to climate change, nutrients, and other factors. This workshop (Part I of II) will provide an introduction on how to use and contribute to this resource. Topics will include an overview of Neotoma and its mission, the Neotoma software ecosystem, database structure and content, and basic data retrieval through the online Neotoma Explorer. We will also cover the basics of prepping data files for upload to Neotoma, and how to work with data using the Neotoma R package. Examples and exercises will focus on diatom data, but are also relevant to pollen, charcoal, plant macrofossils, chemical markers, ostracods, insects, testate amoebae, and others. The afternoon workshop (Part II) will consist of hands-on work preparing data files for upload and retrieving data from Neotoma using the Neotoma R package. This workshop is a good starting point for those interested in pursuing training as a Neotoma Data Steward.

Organizers:

Joy Hobbs, St. Croix Watershed Research Station of the Science Museum of Minnesota, [email protected]
Donald Charles, The Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University, [email protected]
Mark Edlund, St. Croix Watershed Research Station of the Science Museum of Minnesota, [email protected]
Adam Heathcote, St. Croix Watershed Research Station of the Science Museum of Minnesota, [email protected]
Jack Williams, University of Wisconsin, [email protected]

Title: The Neotoma Database (Part II): Data uploading and R package

Date/Time: Sunday, May 15, 1:00 – 5:00 pm

Registration Fee:

              Student/Early Career:  $ 5.00

              Professional:  $ 15.00

Abstract:

Neotoma (neotomadb.org) is a valuable resource to find paleoecological study sites in a region, download data, view stratigraphic diagrams, select sites for new combined calibration datasets, discover distributions of diatom taxa, and use data to understand regional long-term ecological shifts related to climate change, nutrients, and other factors. Participants should attend the morning workshop (Part I) to gain an overview of Neotoma, or already have a familiarity with the database. This workshop (Part II) will focus on preparation of data files for upload to Neotoma and use of the Neotoma R package to retrieve and manage Neotoma data. Following a description and demonstration of procedures, participants will have a hands-on opportunity to work with data using their own laptops. Organizers will provide assistance. We will explain the basics of prepping data files for upload to Neotoma; participants are encouraged to bring their own data files to work with. The R package portion of the workshop assumes basic to intermediate familiarity with R functions, and participants must have a laptop with R Studio installed. The examples and discussion points throughout this workshop will focus on diatom data; however, the information will be relevant to all proxies in Neotoma. This workshop is a good starting point for those interested in pursuing training as a Neotoma Data Steward.

Organizers:

Joy Hobbs, St. Croix Watershed Research Station of the Science Museum of Minnesota, [email protected]
Donald Charles, The Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University, [email protected]
Mark Edlund, St. Croix Watershed Research Station of the Science Museum of Minnesota, [email protected]
Adam Heathcote, St. Croix Watershed Research Station of the Science Museum of Minnesota, [email protected]
Jack Williams, University of Wisconsin, [email protected]

Title: Turning Your Research into Management: Evidence Banking and Synthesis

Date/Time: Sunday, May 15, 8:00 am – 5:00 pm

Registration Fee:

              Student/Early Career:  $ 20.00

              Professional:  $ 35.00

Abstract:

Across academia, the tsunami of literature threatens to overwhelm researchers and environmental managers. Evidence syntheses can overcome this barrier by testing hypotheses across large collections of literature, but the resource requirements of traditional methods are often prohibitive.
We will introduce the Ecological Evidence Exchange (EcoEvidEx), an initiative designed to increase the impact of scientific research by improving its availability for evidence syntheses. Scientists who care about evidence-based decision making can help solve the problem of getting easily understood evidence into the hands of managers. We will introduce major methods for evidence synthesis, including systematic and rapid reviews, and how the types of evidence captured in EcoEvidEx can be used to inform decisions.
Participants will learn how to atomize key research results from articles and bank them into EcoEvidEx, making them easily accessible for researchers and managers. They will also participate in practical exercises to bring evidence together using evidence synthesis approaches. Participants will have the opportunity to provide feedback to improve the EcoEvidEx interface.
Through this workshop, we aim to help CASS-affiliated society members to become leaders in improving adoption of scientific knowledge to inform environmental decision-making. We highly encourage students and early career professionals to participate in the workshop and take a step toward improving research impact.

Organizers:

Angus Webb, Water, Environment and Agriculture Program, The University of Melbourne, Australia, [email protected]
Sylvia Lee, US Environment Protection Agency Office of Research and Development, [email protected]
Jesse Miller, US Environment Protection Agency Office of Research and Development, [email protected]
Susan Nichols, Centre for Applied Water Science, University of Canberra, Australia, [email protected]
Caroline Ridley, US Environment Protection Agency Office of Research and Development, [email protected]
Kate Schofield, US Environment Protection Agency Office of Research and Development, schof[email protected]

Title: Understanding and Applying the Field Indicators of Hydric Soils

Date/Time: Sunday, May 15, 8:00 am – 5:00 pm

Registration Fee:

              Student/Early Career:  $ 25.00

              Professional:  $ 75.00

Abstract:

Field indicators of hydric soils are used in conjunction with vegetation and hydrology data to identify wetlands and delineate their boundaries. Workshop participants will engage in hands-on activities to improve their understanding of hydric soils and the application of the field indicators of hydric soils during 1/2 day classroom and 1/2 day field sessions. Specific workshop topics will include hydric soil formation, terminology, morphology, identification, and delineation. The hydric soil technical standard, difficult hydric soil determinations, and tools/technologies applicable to hydric soil studies will also be discussed. The field session will utilize properties within the City of Grand Rapids parks program, where attendees will have the opportunity to observe and describe a variety of hydric soil field indicators and participate in a hydric soil delineation exercise. Transportation from the conference center to field sites and all field and instructional materials will be provided in addition to a box lunch, drinks, and snacks. Attendees must wear appropriate clothing (e.g., pants, closed toes shoes) for the field session. This workshop is appropriate for students, practitioners, and natural resource managers with all levels of experience. Please join us to improve your ability to identify and document hydric soil conditions, see some of the beautiful wetlands of the Great Lakes region, have fun, and get your hands a little dirty.

Organizers:

Jacob Berkowitz, US Army Corps of Engineers, [email protected]
Chelsea Duball, Grand Valley State University, [email protected]

Title: We Need You to Improve Wikipedia Aquatic Content – Learn How!

Date/Time: Sunday, May 15, 1:00 – 5:00 pm

Registration Fee:

              Student/Early Career:  $ 15.00

              Professional:  $ 25.00

Abstract:

Wikipedia pages are often the first result people turn to for a quick online search and are freely accessible to everyone. Thus, Wikipedia is a major source of scientific information for the general public worldwide. Regrettably, aquatic scientists have not taken full advantage of this platform as a powerful means of communicating accurate and accessible scientific information. Many Wikipedia articles related to aquatic science are either absent or poorly developed. We argue that scientific and professional societies and scientists should prioritize and incentivize contributing to Wikipedia in parallel to traditional scientific outlets to increase both equity and efficiency in transferring aquatic scientific information among our community and to the public. Luckily, anyone can easily contribute valuable content to Wikipedia. We would like to teach you how!

Join us for a half-day workshop on creating and editing aquatic-oriented content on Wikipedia. We will explore how you can use Wikipedia editing in your classrooms. Participants can discuss with others in your specific field about how to prioritize and organize what content might most need improvement.

You will leave this workshop with:
1) the know-how to edit Wikipedia pages,
2) an ability to identify pages that need improvement,
3) lesson plan ideas for using Wikipedia in classrooms,
4) resources to teach others to contribute to Wikipedia, and
5) a network of colleagues to help achieve this endeavor.

Organizers:

Darold Batzer, University of Georgia, [email protected]
Jess Brandt, University of Connecticut, [email protected]
Derek Faust, Clover Park Technical College, [email protected]
Kelly Hondula, National Ecological Observatory Network, [email protected]
Dustin Kincaid, University of Vermont, [email protected]